Solved

How does a RJ45 connector physically lock into a female connector?

Posted on 2013-06-05
10
600 Views
Last Modified: 2013-06-14
Can someone explain how the connector locks in place?

I would like someone to point out the surfaces that make contact to prevent removal.

And how the clip locks and unlocks.

Some pictures or diagrams would be nice.
0
Comment
Question by:Dragon0x40
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • +2
10 Comments
 
LVL 23

Expert Comment

by:tailoreddigital
ID: 39223853
It locks together with the plastic tab on the male end.   It's exactly like a phone wire plugging into the wall.
RJ45
0
 
LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:ded_ch
ID: 39223857
RJ-45 connectors are basically square when looking at it from the front.
On top of the male plug is a little latch that springs up when pushed down.
If inserted into the female part, that latch gets pushed down, but then locks into a little groove on top of the female connector.
This holds the plug in place.

To remove the plug, simply push down the latch on top of the male plug (which is sticking out a little) and pull the cable.

The latches on cheaper network cables tend to break after a little while which is quite annoyning. There are cables which have little plastic covers to protect the latch which are a tiny bit better.
Basically, if the latch breaks, the cable needs to be replaced (my opinion)

Hope this helps.

For images or drawings, your best bet is a google image search ;-)
0
 

Author Comment

by:Dragon0x40
ID: 39223917
Thanks for the responses but I already image searched on google and did not find what I am looking for.

Have you looked at the clip?

It is pretty much straight and does not really have an edge that I can identify as here is where it locks?

I already know the basics about how it works.

The picture would probably have to be an extreme closeup to point out the surfaces and how it locks in.
0
Manage your data center from practically anywhere

The KN8164V features HD resolution of 1920 x 1200, FIPS 140-2 with level 1 security standards and virtual media transmissions at twice the speed. Built for reliability, the KN series provides local console and remote over IP access, ensuring 24/7 availability to all servers.

 
LVL 10

Accepted Solution

by:
bigbigpig earned 250 total points
ID: 39223962
Here you go, attached picture.  The "shoulders" on the side of that clip are held in by the female jack.
RJ45-Shielded-Cat6-Modular-Plug-.jpg
0
 
LVL 23

Assisted Solution

by:tailoreddigital
tailoreddigital earned 250 total points
ID: 39223969
When the corners of the plastic tab (marked green) move far enough into the female RJ45, the springy plastic snaps the two corners behind the metal of the plug.   When you press the tab , it lifts the two corners up and allows the plug to slide out,
The Corners
0
 
LVL 32

Expert Comment

by:_
ID: 39224022
Don't really need a close up pic.

If you look at the male end, you will notice that about a third of the way from the end the tab does a step in (gets skinnier) That that's the part that "catches " on the male end. Call it the "shoulder".

On the female, it looks like you have 3 step downs. but the third (skinniest) is actually a fake. It is only about a mm or 2 thick, and the part behind it is the same as the center step.

When you push the male into the female, the "shoulder" drops down behind the fake stepdown and catches.
When you squeeze the male tab, it lifts the shoulder over the stepdown and the plug comes out.
 It's easier to see if you have a female coupler (phone or cat) to look at.

I can try to do a "mark up" of tailoreddigital's pic if you still need it.
0
 
LVL 32

Expert Comment

by:_
ID: 39224034
I really should have refreshed first.      ; )
0
 

Author Comment

by:Dragon0x40
ID: 39224682
We have a couple of nics where the female socket is not locking the male in place and the cable can be pulled out.

The pieces seem so small I guess there is no way to repair or modify the socket. It is a new nic though so it must be a manufacturing defect.
0
 
LVL 32

Expert Comment

by:_
ID: 39225146
>> ...must be a manufacturing defect

Could be.
I have run into cases where it is really hard to get the plug in far enough so it "clicks", especially if the cable work in others.

Other times it is "fat" male plugs, if it is hard going into any of them. These can usually be "shaved" down a little with a razor knife. But it a pita.
0
 
LVL 23

Expert Comment

by:tailoreddigital
ID: 39226423
You could try to bend the plastic tab on the male out just a bit.   Be careful not to snap the tab off when doing this.   Maybe if it was bent out a bit more it might be enough for it to catch.
0

Featured Post

Secure Your Active Directory - April 20, 2017

Active Directory plays a critical role in your company’s IT infrastructure and keeping it secure in today’s hacker-infested world is a must.
Microsoft published 300+ pages of guidance, but who has the time, money, and resources to implement? Register now to find an easier way.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Title # Comments Views Activity
Windows update hosed the internet connection to my VMs. 9 63
Hostname printer change 8 69
SSL-VPN 1 47
Why isn't my network passing a certain vlan. 24 44
Join Greg Farro and Ethan Banks from Packet Pushers (http://packetpushers.net/podcast/podcasts/pq-show-93-smart-network-monitoring-paessler-sponsored/) and Greg Ross from Paessler (https://www.paessler.com/prtg) for a discussion about smart network …
PRTG Network Monitor lets you monitor your bandwidth usage, so you know who is using up your bandwidth, and what they're using it for.
Viewers will learn how to connect to a wireless network using the network security key. They will also learn how to access the IP address and DNS server for connections that must be done manually. After setting up a router, find the network security…
Internet Business Fax to Email Made Easy - With  eFax Corporate (http://www.enterprise.efax.com), you'll receive a dedicated online fax number, which is used the same way as a typical analog fax number. You'll receive secure faxes in your email, f…

756 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question