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Powershell get-process select start time

Posted on 2013-06-06
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Last Modified: 2013-06-06
Hi Guys,

I have written this powershell script:

 Get-Process -ComputerName server-exam01 dp* | select starttime


however it does not tell me the start time of the process. Please can someone help me.
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Question by:chgl
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LVL 42

Expert Comment

by:Meir Rivkin
ID: 39225163
what is the output of the script run?
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LVL 22

Expert Comment

by:Haresh Nikumbh
ID: 39225175
try this

Get-Process -ComputerName server-exam01 dp* | select StartTime

script
Powershell script is case sensitive

I have run for local computer, and i got above result. it should work on remote computer too
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LVL 42

Expert Comment

by:Meir Rivkin
ID: 39225186
@takecoffee
in this case powersehll is not case sensitive.
i can run Get-Process  *r* | select name,StaRttiMe
and it will work fine, its not the issue.
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LVL 40

Accepted Solution

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Subsun earned 2000 total points
ID: 39225195
That seems to be a bug with Get-Process command in collecting process details.. If remoting enabled on server server-exam01 then you can try..

Invoke-command -ComputerName server-exam01 -scriptblock {Get-Process dp* | select starttime}

Open in new window


Else try with WMI..
get-WmiObject Win32_Process -computername server-exam01 | ? {$_.name -like "dp*"} | Select Name,@{N="CreationDate";E={[System.Management.ManagementDateTimeconverter]::ToDateTime($_.CreationDate)}}

Open in new window

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LVL 71

Expert Comment

by:Qlemo
ID: 39225337
It is not a bug, it's a feature. Many properties of processes are available only on the local machine. The StartTime property is one of them (see NotSupportedException in http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.diagnostics.process.starttime.aspx).
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LVL 22

Expert Comment

by:Haresh Nikumbh
ID: 39225349
aha good to know ..
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Author Comment

by:chgl
ID: 39225686
what does the @ before the {N=....} mean?
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LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:Subsun
ID: 39225700
It's for creating a custom property..

N= is short form of Name=
E= is short form of Expression=

Ref : http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/hh750381.aspx
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Author Comment

by:chgl
ID: 39225714
brlliant thanks :)
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