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nslookup not working ?

Can someone explain why the ping resolves but
when doing nslookup, it does not do a reverse
dns to search for the hostname of the given IP ?

Refer to below:

D:\>ping nnxxxhp1vir03.ggg.local

Pinging nnxxxhp1vir03.ggg.local [10.41.169.204] with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 10.41.169.204: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128
Reply from 10.41.169.204: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=128

Ping statistics for 10.41.169.204:
    Packets: Sent = 2, Received = 2, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms
Control-C
^C
D:\>nslookup 10.41.169.204
Server:  nnnputl30-pppp.ggg.local
Address:  10.50.139.18

*** nnputl30-pppp.ggg.local can't find 10.41.169.204: Non-existent domain

D:\>
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sunhux
Asked:
sunhux
4 Solutions
 
EMJSRCommented:
You can also try and use "ping -a <ip address>". That also does a reverse lookup on an IP.

Not all hosts are configured to allow for reverse lookup. So if you do not get a response, it's an issue with the host, not nslookup.

You can test this by doing a ping on "google.com" and then try "ping -a" and "nslookup". It works just fine.
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apreedCommented:
Your DNS server for ggg.local needs to have a Reverse DNS record (PTR) that is named with the IP address in reverse order... something like 204.169.41.10.in-addr.arpa
This record will contain the hostname

Have a look in your DNS server. If this record isn't there, you'll not get a name back from the IP.

Reverse lookup isn't set up by default on AD: Technet Article
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footechCommented:
Why does the ping resolve?  Because it is using the A record to resolve the hostname to an IP and then showing that information.  In your nslookup you're trying to resolve an IP to a hostname.  If you ran nslookup nnxxxhp1vir03.ggg.local then you would get the same IP info back as your ping command.
As EMJSR mentioned, you can use ping -a <IP> to resolve an IP to a hostname.  In your case, if you used ping -a 10.41.169.204, the ping would still work, but it wouldn't display any info about the hostname, same as your nslookup command because there isn't a PTR record for that IP.

I can tell from your nslookup output that you have at least one Reverse Lookup Zone (probably for 10.50.139.x).  Once a zone is set up with a range that matches the IP of a server/workstation, in most cases the records will be created automatically in that zone either by DHCP or the server/workstation itself (if configured statically).  So if you created a new zone for 10.41.169.x, after a while you should see a PTR record created automatically for 10.41.169.204, unless it was some device like a printer, etc. that is configured statically and doesn't register its own records.
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ZenVenkyArchitectCommented:
Ping contacts Host and LMHost files and DNS cache to resolve any IP to name or Name to IP. Where as NSLookup directly contacts DNS Server to get the information. In this case 10.41.169.204 does not have any records in DNS server.
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