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My batch file is creating a new folder instead of using the one already created

Posted on 2013-06-07
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Last Modified: 2013-06-11
I have a batch file that takes a spreadsheet from one folder, and moves it to another. So, I have a folder called Estimates on the D drive, D:\Estimates. Then, I have a folder on the D drive called Finalize, D:\Finalize. The batch file is supposed to move the spreadsheet from the Estimates folder into the Finalize folder using the date as the folder name. Everything works, except when i run the batch file, it is created a totally new folder called Finalize, instead of using the one i already have created. Why isn't it using the folder "Finalize" I already created? I don't want it to create a new folder. I checked spelling, and its all correct. Here's my script:

@eco off
:: variables
set drive=D:\Finalize
set folder=%date:~10,4%_%date:~4,2%_%date:~7,2%
set backupcmd=xcopy /s /c /d /e /h /i /r/ k /y

echo ### Backing up directory...
%backupcmd% "D:\Estimate" "%drive%\%folder%"
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Question by:brasiman
9 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:Bill Prew
ID: 39229707
it is created a totally new folder called Finalize, instead of using the one i already have created
Well, you can't have two folders directly under D:\ with the same name "Finalize", so where is the new folder located?

~bp
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LVL 52

Expert Comment

by:Bill Prew
ID: 39229717
By the way, /S and /E are contradictory, only use one, depending on if you want empty subfolders copied, or not.

~bp
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Accepted Solution

by:
Qlemo earned 350 total points
ID: 39229833
Bill,

/S and /E can co-exist. /E includes /S, making /S redundant.


brasiman,

If the folder name looks the same, it still might not be the same. If you type D:\Finalize in Explorer, which folder do you get? The original or the newly created one? Whichever you get, the other is spelled incorrectly.
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LVL 52

Expert Comment

by:Bill Prew
ID: 39229864
@Qlemo,

Yes, I understand that XCOPY doesn't error with both /E and /E, but based on their purpose:

/S           Copies directories and subdirectories except empty ones.
/E           Copies directories and subdirectories, including empty ones.


I typically would find it bad practice to include both on the same command.  The next person looking at the script is likely to ask themselves "so, did they want to INCLUDE or EXCLUDE empty folders".  That was the only point I was making.

~bp
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LVL 43

Assisted Solution

by:Steve Knight
Steve Knight earned 75 total points
ID: 39230034
Yes where is this duplicate folder, in the root of D:\ along with the other one?

Can you show us the output of

DIR d:\F*
dir d:\finalize

Steve
0
 
LVL 43

Expert Comment

by:Steve Knight
ID: 39230037
You can make a directory called " Finalize" for instance, i.e. space before it, is the script above your actual script or have you amended it at all to post it?

Can you run it without the @echo off (I assume you have echo off not eco off) and post the results too .

Steve
0
 
LVL 37

Expert Comment

by:Gerwin Jansen
ID: 39232110
Can you show output of:

echo ### Backing up directory...
echo %backupcmd% "D:\Estimate" "%drive%\%folder%"
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LVL 11

Assisted Solution

by:paultomasi
paultomasi earned 75 total points
ID: 39233141
Why complicate things?

1) "set drive=D:\Finalize" is non-descriptive. Is source or destination?

2) "set folder=%date:~10,4%_%date:~4,2%_%date:~7,2%". I presume you date format is "ddd mm/dd/yyyy" and not "ddd m/d/yyyy" or something else.

3) "set backupcmd=xcopy /s /c /d /e /h /i /r/ k /y". Totally unnecessary.

4) "%backupcmd% "D:\Estimate" "%drive%\%folder%"". Obscure and can be confusing. Also, inconsistent because you did not set "D:\Estimate" as a variable.

Try this simple approach and stick to good programming habits:

@echo off
set "source=D:\Estimate"
set "destination=D:\Finalize"

for /f "tokens=2-4 delims=/ " %%a in ('date /t') do set "backup_date=%%c_%%a_%%b"

echo Backing up directory %source%...
xcopy "%source%\*.*" "%destination%\%backup_date%\" /c /d /h /i /k /r /s /y

Open in new window

If your delimiter in %DATE% is not '/' then change "tokens=2-4 delims=/ " to whatever it is. Oh, and note there's a space included after 'delims='.
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:brasiman
ID: 39239552
Thanks everyone! I read it over and over and over again, assuming i mispelled something but never saw it. Sure enough, i had something mispelled. Thanks again!
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