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2 Wireless Routers for One Big House

Posted on 2013-06-08
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Last Modified: 2013-06-14
The Scenario is the following:

 I have a small B&B hotel, and i want to have free WIFI for our guests.

I bought 2 D-link DIR-905L Cloud Router (which are very similar to the 605-L , i think...), and i want to have them at two locations of the house. One will be in the LOBBY and one in the BACKYARD Rooms. Both places are already wired with Ethernet cable from the DSL Modem which is located in the office near the frontdesk... (A time ago the hotel had this configuration but the routers went bad...)

In the office there is 1 PC, 1 DSL Modem, from there 1 ethernet cable goes to a SWITCH, and from there 2 ethernet cables go for the 2 locations of the wireless routers... Also from the switcht there is 1 ehternet cable that goes to the PC, or alternatively the cable can go from the 1st wireless router to the PC which will very close to each other (1meter).

So my question is: How should i set up the WIFI Access for the whole hotel using this 2 wifi routers? (I do not mean how to configure a router for wifi...i do know how to do this..., but instead what i mean is how is essentially the best way to SET THEM UP.... For the little that i have researched it appears to be that i have 2 options: Configure each router independtly, each one with a Login and a Password, or use 1 as a Main wireless router, and the 2nd as an ACCESS POINT only....which i think it means i will only use only 1 login and 1 password fort the whole area of the hotel...

I also read that having 2 wireless routers might increase or boost the signal to reach further places...

havng only one login and password,,,
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Question by:unrinoceronte
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smckeown777 earned 500 total points
ID: 39231525
2 options...

1) As you said, use one router and the other one as an AP only(does it have this function do you know?) That way you setup the SSID/Security the same on both and things will work fine

2) Use both routers seperately - again you can setup the SAME SSID and password regardless...the only difference will be roaming will work...but not quickly, meaning when you move to the 2nd router with the same SSID it will move to it fine, but will pick up a new ip address since its a seperate router/dhcp system...so in effect it will drop the connection in order to establish a new connection to the new router...but if roaming isn't a priority it will function fine...

So again the main point is you can use the same SSID and password...
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by:Rick_O_Shay
ID: 39231535
I don't know the D-Link wifi routers but if you can set it up for just one login that would be best for your clients.
Also you would want to use a "guest" wifi network, if those routers support it, so your customers will not have access to your internal devices etc.
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Author Comment

by:unrinoceronte
ID: 39233065
Hello, thank you both for your quick answers.

So regarding your comments:

- In SMCKEON777's OPTION 2, What do you mean by "roaming will work" ...? (Sorry i am not sure what does ROAMING mean for a a router...)...Is ROAMING a good thing?, usefull?  

 
meaning when you move to the 2nd router with the same SSID it will move to it fine, but will pick up a new ip address since its a seperate router/dhcp system...so in effect it will drop the connection in order to establish a new connection to the new router..

Do i understand you correctly with this?:  If the 2 routers are configured separately, but with the same ssid and password, does it mean that if a hotel guest comes and types for the 1ST TIME to login the password  for the 1st router in the LOBBY, then when he goes to the BACKYARD his computer will pickup the 2nd router (with ROAMING) and connect to it WITHOUT having to type the password to this 2nd router? (even tough they both will have the same SSID and Password?)

I Wish i could have try out both options and found out by myself how btoh work and compare, but for some reason i can not configure the routers and they dont get connected to the internet... I will start a new QUESTION for this...

- Basically what will you say that are the PROS and CONS of both options? ( 1 main router/1Accespoint  VS 2 routers configured separately but with same SSIDs and Passwords)... For what i understand of your explanation both options will work quite similar?

- RICK_O_SHAY: Regarding guests being able to acces our hotel internal computer, I might be wrong, and please correct me if so, but i think i dont need a GUEST account access, (so as you say
so your customers will not have access to your internal devices etc.
..., because as i mention, the Network is configured as this:

A) From the DSL Modem, 1 cable goes to the Hotel Office Computer (which is the only hotel computer for our administrative and operations use) , and a second cable goes to a TREND NET  SWITCH... (I have to mention that the DSL Modem is in itself a router (i think)..., because it has 4 ETHERNET PORTS...it is a TENDA modem...)

B) FROM the switch there will be 2 cables going "OUT" :  1 cable goes to the 1st router, and another cable goes to 2nd router.

So my understanding is that since the OFFICE computer is connected directly to the MODEM, and the guests connect to the routers wich are connected to the same modem through a switch, there is no way they can access OUR computer...? Am i wrong?

I Wish i could have try out both options and found out by myself how both work and compare, but for some reason i can not configure the routers and neither of them gets connected to the internet... (For their configuration i have connected the modem to the router, and from the router to the Office PC).... The strange thing is that in my Home, i have the same DSL MODEM, the same ISP PRovider, and the same ROUTER which i set up a year ago...but now someting is wrong and i can not configure them...I will start a new QUESTION for this...
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Assisted Solution

by:smckeown777
smckeown777 earned 500 total points
ID: 39233092
Hi, yes ROAMING means moving from one AP/router to another and not having to login or switch networks...hence its automatic...

To enable roaming you need 2 things - SSID and Password/security matching

That is, the security setting(WEP/WPA/WPA2) needs to the the exact same...then when I move from one part of the house to another it my laptop/phone will auto connect to the 2nd router

But if you can't configure either router at all...then long as you have the password to connect to the wifi it will still work - but the SSID's being different means you have to supply the 2 details to the guests - i.e. front lobby SSID and backyard SSID...it will still work

As for your description of how the modem/routers are setup then technically you already have a GUEST type setup - i.e. the users connected to either router shouldn't have access to the pc you mention in the office...so think that is ok
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Author Comment

by:unrinoceronte
ID: 39233115
Thanks for your quick response!,

So, basically BOTH OPTIONS work almost the same?, the difference being that when a person moves from one area to the other in the Second option (2 routers) the TIME to reconnect to the 2nd router will be a little slower than using the 1st option (1 router/1 AP) ?

Also, are you sure having the 2nd OPTION (2 routers, same SSSID same password), the hotel guest (person), for the 1ST TIME that he wants to connect to our Wifi, he will only have to TYPE once the password for the 1st router, and he will not have to type it again when he moves to the 2nd router? (this will be made automatically?)   Because if he has to type it 2 times, i guess is almost the same to have 2 different SSIDs and maybe one same password... Isnt it?

By the way, how do i know if the routers have the option to "convert" into an ACCESS POINT?
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by:smckeown777
smckeown777 earned 500 total points
ID: 39233185
Yes, both options will work, one is slower to switch since technically its a different network(i.e. a different DHCP router is providing the access so you get an ip-drop and ip-renew to the new network), but it still will work

This is the norm for wifi networks with AP's - one SSID, one password - you can move throughout a building and never have to enter password again...i.e. roaming

Some routers have an ACCESS POINT mode - but to make any router function as an AP you basically connect the cable modem to the LAN socket on the router - not the WAN as per normal...that way it operates as another 'client' device on the network linked to the main router...(note you also turn off DHCP on the router, so in essence it turns it into an AP)

So again if you have login access to the routers web interface you can check...but it should function fine either way
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by:unrinoceronte
ID: 39240612
Right now i am set to install this to routers.

I have been reading around and i have a concern: Using the 2nd option (2 routers with same SSID and password) will it produce IP CONFLICTS, or something like that with the hotel guest laptops, tablets or smartphones that get connected to them via wireless?

I dont know much about routers, so please let me know if i should have a DIFFERENT IP Address for each router? The default ip's that come in this DLINK routers is: 192.168.0.1 (which is the one i use to login to that routers control Panel, or setup wizard...)  I was thinking of leaving them both with the same, or change them as this:
router A: 192.168.7.1
router A: 192.168.8.1
Note: The ISP dsl modem has the ip: 192.168.1.1
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by:smckeown777
smckeown777 earned 500 total points
ID: 39240723
Ok few things here...

Where did you hear about this 'IP CONFLICTS'? At the end of the day since you are using 2 DIFFERENT routers then yes...technically a laptop down in the front office MIGHT have the same ip as one on the other router...but this won't really mean anything since they are on SEPERATE networks/routers...so again bit confused as to what 'they' mean by this

Yes each router should have a different ip to MANAGE it(i.e. login to it and set it up etc) - so in reality when you do this you can setup DIFFERENT DHCP ranges -

Router A - ip is 192.168.7.1 - so they should hand out ip's in the 192.168.7.x subnet
Router B - ip is 192.168.8.1 - so they should hand out ip's in the 192.168.8.x subnet

So if you set it up like that then ip conflicts will not happen...
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Author Comment

by:unrinoceronte
ID: 39246361
Hi Smckeon777, well what i did is that in the meantime i was doing some google searches on the subject, nothing specific, just general things and i tiught ip conflicts could be an issue... I guess not as you mention.

Thanks a lot for your help, was very thorough and i manage to configure and install the 2 routers using OPTION 2, and giving them different IPs, but same SSIDs and password.

I was able to do some few tests, with 2 laptops and 1 tablet, and things went well... sometimes the MACbook didnt reconnect by itself when it los cotnnectivity to one of the routers. I had to manually select again the Network name or turn off and turn on Wireless on the macbookpro...  anyways, i will do some more tests in the near future and ask guests for some feedback.

Thanks very much.
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Author Comment

by:unrinoceronte
ID: 39246398
Smckeon777: If you can, i have a further question regarding what you said in one of your posts
Some routers have an ACCESS POINT mode - but to make any router function as an AP you basically connect the cable modem to the LAN socket on the router - not the WAN as per normal...that way it operates as another 'client' device on the network linked to the main router...(note you also turn off DHCP on the router, so in essence it turns it into an AP)

Is the part where your say " connect the cable modem to the LAN socket on the router " correct?  If that is so, how is the router get an ip and internet connection from the modem?, maybe, but correct me if i am wrong, you meant connect the 1st router to the modem normally, and then connect the second router to the 1st modem but to the LAN socket this way the 2nd router is a client of the 1st router... Please clarify me with this...

thaniks again
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by:smckeown777
ID: 39246830
Yes that is correct - connect the 2nd router to the 1st router using their LAN ports - therefore the 2nd router is a client of the first

What you are doing by this is turning the 2nd router into a basic switch(with an aerial) - which is in reality what an access point is

In order to complete this setup you then turn off DHCP on the 2nd router - since in essence it will not be needed - the 2nd router will communicate with the first router and you will now be on the same network(wifi network)

Sounds complicated, which is why its probably simpler to get an AP...but either way will work
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