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LDAP Vs Active Directory

Hi,

Can anyone clarify the difference between and LDAP server and Active directory, its my understanding that LDAP is the protocol used for to interact with Active directory database and LDAP can also be a separate entity and a database in its own right.

Thanks
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simonphoenix10
Asked:
simonphoenix10
1 Solution
 
Kiran ChCommented:
An LDAP is a protocol and which means standards to keep up while developing a software.
But an Active Directory is the microsoft's implementation works and uses LDAP in its poprietary software. AD has been developed providing a lot more functionality than just a directory.
There are many softwares that use LDAP not only just AD.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Active_Directory
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_LDAP_software
The above links from Wiki may give you a picture and may give you idea about what each other is for.
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msifoxCommented:
Active Directory is Microsofts version of LDAP. They did what they often do: take something which has already proved to be good, add custom extensions that make it at least partially incompatible, and ask PR to come up with a great new name for it. Ok, maybe this was a bit unfair. They added a lot, and the result is really good. But the things that they added are mostly highly specificly for use in domains of windows servers.
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SandyCommented:
both are directory services having centralized repository of all objects like users and groups
LDAP is opensource anyone can use, MS ADDS is paid one.

"Linux is only free, if your time has no value"

Cheers
SA
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simonphoenix10Author Commented:
Thanks all  msifox:

When you say Active Directory is MS version of LDAP does this mean it does not use the standard based version of the LDAP or Active Directory encompasses a protocol based on LDAP but has been adapted
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Dave HoweSoftware and Hardware EngineerCommented:
Ok, you need to distinguish between a directory service - for which examples are Active Directory, eDirectory, and Yellow Pages (unix) - and the protocol used to access it - LDAP (lightweight directory access protocol).

By analogy, AD is like a database server - MS SQL, ORACLE, MYSQL etc - and LDAP is like ODBC - its a method of access to the server, with a specific defined language and format, but the server may support other protocols too.
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Rich RumbleSecurity SamuraiCommented:
AD is able to be Queried and Administered using the standard LDAP protocol, for the most part. There are additions that M$ has added that go beyond the LDAP RFC's (4510 and 4511)
Think of Ldap as an excel spreadsheet or simple database, with a standard method of searching and updating, with standard columns, rows and tables. Then think of AD as adding additional pages, as well as tables, columns and rows. A query against a Linux/Unix Ldap service and one against AD can both be identical in many instances, and there is no OS dependance to make the query, as long as they speak the "jive... turkey" :)
An analogy might be, HTML is a language, with standards, rules and procedures, and those can be extended further should a browser maker wish to, but it's likely to be proprietary, not everyone will implement the extensions, but other than that, the rest is well established and understood. AD is ldap that goes to eleven :)
-rich
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Dave HoweSoftware and Hardware EngineerCommented:
I think the most interesting changes MS have made to LDAP are in the field of authentication, but they aren't required - the standard methods still work (so you can do everything you could want from, for example, Apache Directory Studio)
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