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Browser support for HTML5 block-level links

I've read that html5 supports block-level links.  In a site that validates for html5, if I code some of my divs in <a> tags, will all desktop and mobile browsers interpret that correctly? Or would I be wise to stick with inline links only for now?

Thanks!
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Jonathan Greenberg
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Jonathan Greenberg
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1 Solution
 
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
not all browsers support html5 fully and it is not a fixed standard.  You'd have to test it and see if the browsers in your customers range support it otherwise stick to html4
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Kim WalkerWeb Programmer/TechnicianCommented:
Can you provide a link to an example? You don't need HTML5 to change the display style of an <a> tag to "block."
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
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Jonathan GreenbergAuthor Commented:
Thanks, ve3ofa.

Yes, xmediaman. Here's an example of what I mean, from the page ve3ofa linked to:

Here's the HTML4 way:

<div class="story"> <h3><a href="story1.html">Bruce Lawson voted sexiest man on Earth</a></h3> <p><a href="story1.html"><img src="bruce.jpg" alt="full story. " />A congress representing all the planet's women unanimously voted Bruce Lawson as sexiest man alive.</a></p> <p><a href="story1.html">Read more</a></p> </div>
Versus the block-level links that are allowed under HTML5, where the whole block is surrounded by a tags:

In <abbr>HTML</abbr> 5, you code it like this: <pre><code><article> <a href="story1.html"> <h3>Bruce Lawson voted sexiest man on Earth</h3> <p><img src="bruce.jpg" alt="gorgeous lovebundle. ">A congress representing all the planet's women unanimously voted Bruce Lawson as sexiest man alive.</p> <p>Read more</p> </a>
My understanding about HTML5 is that the whole block could even be in a div, and the whole div could then be surrounded by a tags.  It's a more attractive presentation, as well as more functional, I think.  But maybe it's still not a good idea just yet.

Do either of you know if all browsers will render it correctly the HTML5 way?
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
actually what it does is make the entire block a link to the content.  ie10/firefox and chrome support it.

See sample video
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Jonathan GreenbergAuthor Commented:
Thanks, ve3ofa.

Yeah, I prefer making the whole block a link.  I think it's a nicer look than having each of the three elements in the block, all pointing to the same link, respond on separate mouseovers.  And even though the article you linked to uses a byline that refers to Google's "caution," the comment from Google's John Mueller seems to make the point that as long as the textual content of the link is clear, then it shouldn't be a problem.

Wow, I just noticed that you created a screen capture video to make your point!  Thanks, and well done!

Regards,
Jon
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