Solved

Validation Rule (Formula)

Posted on 2013-06-11
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Last Modified: 2013-06-12
Hello Experts,

I have a worksheet, that I need to control if the user should be entering a value into a cell.

See image...

example
The weight columns, are the ONLY columns the user is allowed to type but ONLY IF there is a pallet # to the left.

Is it possible to reject a weight, if there's no pallet listed?

Thank you in advance for your help!

~ Geekamo
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Question by:Geekamo
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6 Comments
 
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Accepted Solution

by:
Patrick Matthews earned 400 total points
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It looks like your data start in Row 5 or so.  So...

1) Select F5:F?????

2) Go to Data Validation, type Custom, using formula:

=COUNT($E5:$F5)=2

That will only allow entries in Col F if both Col E and Col F have numeric values.
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Assisted Solution

by:Flyster
Flyster earned 100 total points
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Click on cell F1. Go to the data tab - data validation. Under the Settings tab go to Allow and select Custom. In Formula enter "=LEN(E1)>0" (without quotes.) Make sure Ignore Blank is unchecked. Copy F1, highlight F2 to whatever ending cell you want. Right-click one of the cells, select paste special - validation. That should work for you.

Flyster
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by:Geekamo
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@ matthewspatrick,

I ended up using, "=COUNT($E3)=1".

@ Flyster,

I wasn't familiar with the LEN function, but that's pretty cool how that function gets the same answer in a different way. (I just read up on it to see how it functions)

@ All,

For now, I'll stick with the COUNT function - only because I am more familiar with it. But you both gave me great answers.

Any objections to me splitting the points between you both?

~ Geekamo
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LVL 22

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by:Flyster
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Geekamo,

LEN function gives you the LENGTH of the data in the cell. So if your name was in A1, LEN(A1) would give you 7.  I have no problem with you giving Matthewspatrick all the points. His response was first and chosen. I'm just glad you found a solution to your problem.
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Expert Comment

by:Patrick Matthews
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Either way suits me :)
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by:Geekamo
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@ all,

400/100 split

Thank you again!

~ Geekamo
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