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Deciphering netstat output

Posted on 2013-06-12
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Last Modified: 2013-06-17
When running the netstat command with the 'a' and 'n' options, the output includes numerous lines resembling the following:

udp        0      0  *.*                    *.*

What does this mean. I'm concerned about the sheer number of them (there are 945 such records). Is this a problem?
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Question by:babyb00mer
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by:jools
ID: 39242997
looks like there may be a column missing from the output, I would have thought you should see the port numbers udp is listening on and they are probably related to services.

If it's linux try running netstat -taupen which will give a full list and the daemon associated with the port.
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woolmilkporc earned 500 total points
ID: 39243958
Hi,

these are probably UDP structures set aside by the kernel for communicating with application-layer servers, like nfsd, biod or automountd.

Is this an NFS server, and does it serve quite a bunch of active NFS mounts?

Find out how many NFS threads are running:

ps -Am -o pid,thcount,comm,args | grep -E "nfsd| biod"

(Please note the space in front of " biod"!)

Do the figures shown in the second column (roughly) correspond to the number of those UDP entries without a specific local address/port?
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