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Veeam Backup to NAS then Google Cloud

Hi,

I have just virtualised our environment using Hyper-V and have installed a trial version of Veeam Backup and Veeam Cloud. We have an 8TB NAS for local backups and plan on using Google cloud for offsite.

I wanted to know what the best practice is for this kind of setup bearing in mind 1 full backup is about 600GB and incrementals are about 25GB using reverse incremental.

I'd like to go back about 6 months if possible, should i be doing full backups as well periodically? I am consious off the space this is likely to use, any suggestions to keep this to a minimum and still give me the backup plan i want?

Thanks.
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James Cook
Asked:
James Cook
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2 Solutions
 
dec0mpileCommented:
You should have a full backup at least once per month (the reason for this is because, if you need to do a restore incremental backups become very time consuming after that). That being said, it would probably be even better if you get a full every two weeks (with your space that would mean less then 6 months on hand).

With the size of backup space available I think you should be able to easily keep 6 moths if you do monthly full backups.

6 * 600GB = 3.6 TB and keep your incrementals for 4 or 5 weeks (That's 7*5*25GB = 875GB)
This should put you around 4.5TB

You can tweak this depending on your environment
EX:
If your company does not do any work on the weekend, just do the incremental backup Monday to Friday.
Delete all incremental backups as soon as the full backup is completed for that month (if the backup software has that feature).
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James CookAuthor Commented:
Ok, thats sound great for my onsite backups, thanks.

What do you think the best way to backup to Google cloud would be?

There's no way i can backup 4.5TB every other week, it would probably take that long to upload the files.

If i only backup the incrementals this wouldn't be a viable DR plan as we'd potentially loose the full backup due to it only being stored locally.

What is best practive for this element of the backup plan?
I am mainly concerned about the time and bandwidth used for the uploads.
Thanks
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dec0mpileCommented:
Unfortunately, you need to have excellent upload speeds for cloud backup to be effective. If you do not have at least  35 Mbps up, I don't think this is a viable solution.

Let's do some estimates:
Full utilization of  75 Mbps up = ~5GB in 9 minutes. This Means that 600GB full backup will take roughly about 18 hours to complete.
Full utilization with 50 Mbps up = ~5GB in 14 minutes = 28 hours
This is not bad if you run it at night or weekend after business hours. Plan out how you would do the uploads and schedule them on different nights so you don't interrupt business operations.

Look for tools that automate this process and support compression to reduce the upoad time. Here is one I know about: http://www.cloudberrylab.com/google-storage-explorer-pro.aspx

**If you do not have the upload speeds necessary, and acquiring them is out of the question, I suggest that you abandon the idea of cloud backup and look for a Offsite Vaulting service in your area (like: http://www.ironmountain.com/Services/Data-Backup-and-Recovery.aspx). Store the data on tape or other media and have them pick it up daily or weekly and store it in a vault for you.
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James CookAuthor Commented:
ok thanks, that's some great info.
I do have 30Mbps upload so I guess it could just about work.
I think i'll give it a go this weekend and start it off on Friday evening and see how long it takes.
What sort of retention policy would you recommend to keep in the cloud?
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dec0mpileCommented:
Retention policy recommendation is tough. It really depends on the business and type of data you are backing up.

In many states there are laws mandating certain number of years for emails, personal and financial information, and medical records. This is something you should investigate if your backup falls into this category. As far as general data goes, you have to meet with key people in the company and understand what is the business need.
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James CookAuthor Commented:
Very helpful answers, thanks.
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