DOS box on a Mac

I have a customer that has asked the following question. Could anyone help?

I’ve installed Dosbox on a Mac, and it seems to work well so far.
 
For our DOS programme to work, we need a C: drive, and a D: drive (which is our shared network drive).
 
In Dosbox, I’ve managed to create a C: drive by mounting it to a folder that I created (DOSBOX) in the ‘Home’ folder on a Mac, using the following command:
 
MOUNT C ~/DOSBOX
 
It confirmed that the following path has been mounted successfully: /users/steve/dosbox
 
I now need to create a D: drive.
 
I’ve mapped the network drive (our nas server) using the cmd+K shortcut, and added it as a login item to my profile, so every I startup it automatically looks for this drive, and appears as a shared resource.
 
The problem I have, is that in Dosbox I can’t MOUNT the D: drive as I can’t tell it where to find it (ie with a text command etc).
 
Can you through any light on this? as in Windows it would be easy because we simply map a lettered drive to it, and Dosbox understands where to find it, but I’m struggling to do this with a Mac
grovenetsupportAsked:
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grovenetsupportConnect With a Mentor Author Commented:
Comments back from customer

In Finder, using cmd+K, my nas-server/public can be mounted (then has a little 'eject' symbol next to it)

As you say, dragging this into terminal, then LS, shows 'volumes/public'

Also, in Finder, it is shown as a 'shared resource' (with an eject symbol).

When clicking on Nas (nas-server) to explore, then 'public', then any folder, if you right click a folder and choose 'get info', it gives the following info:

Where: /Volumes/public
Server: smb://nas-server/public

In Dosbox, the following command now works:

MOUNT D /VOLUMES/PUBLIC

(upto now, I have been trying: MOUNT D SMB://NAS-SERVER/PUBLIC, which does not work).

With this, now we can MOUNT C, and MOUNT D, so our programs should now work.
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strungCommented:
Try opening a terminal window and draging and dropping the network volume into the window. This should give you the path name to the network drive.
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grovenetsupportAuthor Commented:
I couldnt get it to work that way, but by pressing Cmd+K in Finder, it claims that the server address is:

Smb://192.168.1.2/public

(but Dosbox says directory doesn’t exist).

I need someway of making Dosbox think this is a physical drive
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strungCommented:
Does "public" show as a mounted volume on your desktop?

If so, what happens when you drag and drop the "public" icon into a terminal window?
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strungCommented:
Also, assuming the shared volume is mounted, in terminal type:

cd /Volumes

Then type ls

(ell ess, not one ess)

that should list the mounted volumes.

The address of your volume should be something like /Volumes/Shared

(commands and names are case sensitive)
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grovenetsupportAuthor Commented:
This was the work around which worked
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