Questions for Reporting Analysts

To the BI and reporting analysts and those that perform similiar roles,

I'm thinking about applying for a reporting/business analyst role in my department.  This is going to be a new position in the department. The details of the job have yet to be announced; from what my manager has told me, the duties are to collaborate with the other teams in the department to create databases, dashboards, run reports, analyze, gather trends, present executive reports...

How should I approach the position to help the hiring manager understand that while one person to start maybe fine but ultimately what they are wanting to do with the reporting system requires several developers and offering competitive salaries?   I'm concerned that I will experience a similiar challenge at my previous employer where the 1 developer was doing a lot of unpaid overtime because there were so many requests be made and the expectation was, "Can you have that done now?"
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Robert SaylorConnect With a Mentor Senior DeveloperCommented:
What you should focus on and this is what I did when I worked at Tekelec a while ago:

1. CRM - give them a way to input data into your program. I would go with a home grown system. It's a lot of work to start but it produces the exact output because you program it.

2. Reports - Use it's a very nice and easy to use php graph system.

3. Use best practices for databases. Create indexes, use joins and try not to re-produce the same data in multiple areas. Try to use single complex queries and that will make your report process faster.

Overall if the developer worked 8 hours a day on a project like this it could be production ready within 6 months to 1 year. The one I worked on lasted 3 years but that was with constant add-on's. This is based on 1 person. The department I created the CRM was about 20 people using it.

4. Deploy AJAX in your business applications. That will keep the flow going without confusing your users.

To date I have created 2 very large complex CRM systems. One I have not modified since I left Tekelec over 3 years ago. They still use it today with no modifications to it.
Ray PaseurConnect With a Mentor Commented:
The details of the job have yet to be announced...
That notwithstanding, it sounds like an interesting job with the ability to gather insights into the systems and practices of the organization.  Those insights are a key to professional advancement.  Unpaid overtime is the opposite of professional advancement.

If I were in your place I would ask myself if I am happy being a developer or if I would be happier as an operations research manager, perhaps with a larger view of the business.
dorianitAuthor Commented:
Rsaylor & Ray,

Thank you for the expanded insights!  I'm recording those to memory.  I'll wait for further responses before awarding and closing.

Thank you.
Robert SaylorSenior DeveloperCommented:
No problem. Let me know if you have any other questions. This has been my primary job for the last 5 - 6 years.
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