C++ arrays

I'm currently in a class, and was wondering if someone could give me a basic tutorial to arrays.  I have a general idea of what they are used for, but need help with the C++ coding.  Thanks.
ad_aragonAsked:
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epichero22Connect With a Mentor Commented:
Ehh well it's a really open question, but if you're beginning, basically an array is a container that can contain multiple values.  For example, if you had a single variable for one employee number, you can write:

int employee_number;

But if you have multiple employees, say, 5 of them, you can write:

int employee_number[5];

And each instance can contain a number for every employee.  So, you now have five variables, each of which can be accessed as follows:

employee_number[0];
employee_number[1];
employee_number[2];
employee_number[3];
employee_number[4];

Notice how the array starts at "0"....the number is referred to as an "index", and indexes always start at "0".

Anyways, there's a lot more information to arrays, but first grasp this concept and you should be OK with learning future concepts.  If you need another example, you can watch this Youtube video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYB16A8NyB0

Is that what you're looking for?
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peprCommented:
You should learn that the plain old arrays are related to the C language. In C++, you may be interested in std::vector instead.
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HooKooDooKuCommented:
At its most basic, an array is a set of variables of all the same data type that are stored in memory sequentially.  The individual variables are accessed via the '[ ]' operator.

Basic Syntax
int X[10];         //Create 10 int variables
int X[0] = 1;
int X[1] = 2;
int X[2] = X[0] + X[1]
int X[9] = 10;
int X[10] = "Likely a memory access violation because you just tried to access past the end of the array.

Anther thing about arrays is that an array is simply a pointer to the 1st element of the array.  In other words, based on the above example, the following is a LOGICALLY a true statement (but perhaps not syntactically)
X = &(X[0])
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peprCommented:
an array is simply a pointer to the 1st element of the array

When programming, thoughs must be as accurate/clear as possible. An array, when passed as an argument, is passed as the adress of the first element. However, it differs from a pointer. The array probably occupies more space and the compiler "thinks" about the array as about a different type.

What should be emphasized in the contex, you should always pay attention to the size of the array when working with it because there is no "index out of range" automatic error checking. Also because of that std::vector and working with iterators may be both easier (especially when using the new kind of loop that comes with C++11) and less error prone.
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