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Out of Control - SQL Transaction Log

I have just started with a compny which has let their Transaction Log ballon to a riduculous level  305 GB for a !.5 GB Catalog.

The backups have been in FULL mode not SIMPLE

The Database was participating in a replication environment.

PUSH replication from a Master Distributed Database

1 Publisher , 3 Subscribers.

One of the Other subscribers - has a trans log of 38 GB.... still bloated in my mind but livable.

What would you recommend to get the Transaction Log to a reasonable level.

Could a person do a detach and reaatach with a new log file ignoring the bloated 305 gb log.
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baeriali
Asked:
baeriali
2 Solutions
 
AbhishekJhaCommented:
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Racim BOUDJAKDJIDatabase Architect - Dba - Data ScientistCommented:
What would you recommend to get the Transaction Log to a reasonable level.
First, backup your transaction logs.  Second, make sure that nothing is creating a bottleneck in transaction distribution.  As long as the transactions are not properly distributed, log will grow.
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nemws1Commented:
My question would be if you are doing *any* backups?  FULL and LOG backups should be done at a minimum.  If they are, the transaction log should not be getting that big, I would think.  I do hourly LOG backups and nightly FULL (or DIFF) backups and don't have any log bloat.

Others will yell at me here for even mentioning it, but once backed up (and a backup schedule is set up as well - search for "Ola Hallengren" and perhaps install the excellent maintenance script he offers for free), you can shrink the LOG file back down to a reasonable size.  You can do this with SSMS or using TSQL.
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chapmandewCommented:
How many virtual log files are there in the log?  Use DBCC LOGINFO to find out.  If you're looking at several thousand VLFs then that will slow replication down a LOT.
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Anthony PerkinsCommented:
Tim,

When you get a chance can you take a look at this thread:
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Microsoft/Development/MS-SQL-Server/SQL-Server-2005/Q_28150465.html

This is in reference to a blog you wrote some years ago in Tech Republic.

Thanks,
Anthony
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nemws1Commented:
ac - did you post that to the correct thread?
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Anthony PerkinsCommented:
ac - did you post that to the correct thread?
Yep.  Sorry for the hijack.  It was directed at chapmandew.
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baerialiAuthor Commented:
All solutions were reasonable.  The only reason I chose the two I did was it seemed specific  to the problem I was faced with.  Would like to say thanks for the info.on reading the contents of the log file.
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