Solved

Catalyst switch POE

Posted on 2013-06-17
3
493 Views
Last Modified: 2013-07-04
I have a question about the the distance from an AP to the POE port on the Cisco switch. Is there a limitation as far as the distance for the Cisco switch to provide the POE to the AP? The only answer I can think of is the limitation of the LAN cable Cat5e, which is 100meters. Other than that, I am not sure. Any thoughts? Thx
0
Comment
Question by:leblanc
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
3 Comments
 
LVL 3

Accepted Solution

by:
Teeshirt earned 167 total points
ID: 39254118
The distance limitation is 150m, but there is no limit. You just need to make sure that the AP still receives enough voltage to work, if you go above the 150 meters of cable the link must operate in full duplex, 10 100 or Ge is up to you as long as the duplex is full
0
 
LVL 12

Assisted Solution

by:TomRScott
TomRScott earned 167 total points
ID: 39254318
I'd stick with the 100M limitation. Some even use a "rule of thumb specification" of 90M. 90M is a good limitat if any patch panel or patch cord is to be used.

For direct runs between electronics I have had no problems with the 100M limitation. This is espcially true if your run is not either "certified" nor "qualified" at the speed you intend to use (typically 1G) using a decent tool.

In a pinch, you can try more (as long as you test it with a decent qualifier), but I would carefully document anything that is beyond specification in a manner that will be referenced during any diagnostics, especially for any intermittent failures over that run.

I often run into CAT5 patch panels and cables being used with CAT5e or CAT6 runs. Further, I ASSUME that if any patching is involved, that some user or tech will use lower rated patch cables (i.e. CAT5) at some time in the future.  Thus, I stick to 100M less "reasonable" patch cable lengths in most cases.

 - Tom
0
 
LVL 14

Assisted Solution

by:bfason
bfason earned 166 total points
ID: 39261090
Power does bleed over distance but if it's an 802.3af POE compliant device then it will run at full recommended ethernet lengths. Basically any device that is POE compliant will not draw more than 12.95 watts @ 44V DC. Most cisco switches supply 15.4 watts per port so a device drawing 12.95 watts would pull 41V and 13.9ish Watts from the switch over 328 feet assuming 24gauge cat5/6 wiring.

Not sure which AP you are talking about but most pull around 10-11W peak power.
0

Featured Post

What, When and Where - Security Threats from Q1

Join Corey Nachreiner, CTO, and Marc Laliberte, Information Security Threat Analyst, on July 26th as they explore their key findings from the first quarter of 2017.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the problem.   Tips on how to secure IoT devices, even the dumbest ones, so they can't be used as part of a DDoS botnet.  Use PRTG Network Monitor as one of the building blocks, to detect unusual…
PRTG Network Monitor lets you monitor your bandwidth usage, so you know who is using up your bandwidth, and what they're using it for.
Viewers will learn how to connect to a wireless network using the network security key. They will also learn how to access the IP address and DNS server for connections that must be done manually. After setting up a router, find the network security…
Get a first impression of how PRTG looks and learn how it works.   This video is a short introduction to PRTG, as an initial overview or as a quick start for new PRTG users.
Suggested Courses

632 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question