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Listing drives in a RAID array

Posted on 2013-06-18
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Last Modified: 2013-07-05
I'm looking for a way to find about the physical members (disks) that are members of a RAID array. I know that one of the drives is bad. I need to find out what type of drives they are (i.e. size, speed or just make and model - whatever), so that I can quote for a replacement disk drive. I thought it might be do-able in WMI, but I haven't been able to find anything that actually looks at what's underneath what's presented by the RAID controller. So now I'm considering something like SNMP. I don't know. Any thoughts?

I'd prefer something I can run remotely.
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Question by:d0ughb0y
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David earned 250 total points
ID: 39257530
This is all vendor/product specific.  Few RAID controllers even integrate with WMI to begin with. Same with SNMP.  Unless there is an agent daemon designed for your host system and/or your RAID array has an ethernet port then forget SNMP.

Are you looking for some generic solution, or do you have a specific controller you are asking about?

There is no solution that works with all controllers.  There is no universal standard as all RAID controllers use vendor/product specific code and most of it is only available under non-disclosure.

Furthermore, even if there was a standard, not all RAID controllers have ability to respond to external queries for such things.  They may not even be aware of them all, as some do not care about things like drive RPMs.
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by:d0ughb0y
ID: 39257740
I was afraid you were going to say that...

In this case, it's a Dell RAID controller, which I believe actually does have SNMP capability. I know that they have proprietary software (OpenManage) that can look at that information, but was hoping for a quick-n-dirty command-line way to get it, in general, so that I can find out which drive is bad, and what I need to replace it with. [sigh]
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by:d0ughb0y
ID: 39303033
Dell OpenManage can provide the SNMP tools for this, so I was able to get what I needed from there. Thanks for confirming what I already thought was the case.
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