structure

How does the compiler pads a structure? Does it always pads sequentially?
Consider a 64 bit machine


struct PAD {
   uint32_t a;
   uint32_t b;
   uint64_t c;
   uint32_t d;
   // Will it add 4 bytes padding at the end or can it pad anywhere?
}
perlperlAsked:
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Kent OlsenConnect With a Mentor Data Warehouse Architect / DBACommented:
It depends mostly on the compiler options.

The selected alignment may cause the items in the structure to be packed (no padding) or aligned at the 16, 32, or 64 bit mark.  If alignment is at 64 bits, there will be padding after every item that is shorter than 64 bits, or any array that is isn't a multiple of 64 bits.



Good Luck,
Kent
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jkrCommented:
Padding always occurs at the end of a structure, otherwise that would not make sense at all. In your above case, no padding will occur anyway, since the structure already is 4-byte-aligned. It would be different if it was like this:

struct PAD {
   uint32_t a;
   uint32_t b;
   uint64_t c;
   uint32_t d;
   char f;
   // 3 padding bytes will be added here unless specified differently
} 

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ozoCommented:
Each non-bit-field member of a structure or union object is aligned in an implementationdefined
manner appropriate to its type.
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perlperlAuthor Commented:
in my case it does add 4 bytes padding
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jkrCommented:
I don't think so - the struct size is 16 bytes, and that should be what 'sizeof()' reports.
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Kent OlsenData Warehouse Architect / DBACommented:
Hi perl,

What you're probably seeing is that the structure is packed (no padding between the variables) and a total of 20 bytes in length.

  PAD pad_array[2];

Then depending on the data alignment option, the array above will pad the array so that each item starts on a 64-bit boundary.


Kent
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jkrCommented:
Kdo,,

a 20-byte sized struct isn't really well-aligned for 64 bit adresses either... something is quite confusing about this whole setup.
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Kent OlsenData Warehouse Architect / DBACommented:
Hi jkr,

I think that it can be explained simply by data alignment and structure blocking.  If data alignment is to the word (64 bits) and structures are not packed, there will be a half word of padding after each 32-bit entity.  

If alignment is to the half-word (32 bits) or packed structures are forced due to a PRAGMA or other compiler option, then there will be no padding in the structure.


Kent
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ozoCommented:
You can use the offsetof and sizeof macros to determine where and whether padding was added in your implementation.
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sarabandeCommented:
at win7-64 bit  vc compiler with 8-byte alignment i have

struct PAD {
   UINT32 a;
   UINT32 b;
   UINT64 c;
   UINT32 d;
//   char e;
}; 

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    PAD pad;
    std::cout << (int)((UINT64)(void*)&pad.b-(UINT64)(void*)&pad.a) << "|" 
              << (int)((UINT64)(void*)&pad.c-(UINT64)(void*)&pad.a) << "|"
              << (int)((UINT64)(void*)&pad.d-(UINT64)(void*)&pad.a) << "|"
//              << (int)((UINT64)(void*)&pad.e-(UINT64)(void*)&pad.a) << "|"
              << (int)(sizeof(pad)) << std::endl;

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the output was

4|8|16|24

what pretty much is that i expected.

with the char member e, the output was

4|8|16|20|24

what also is consequent.

the rule is that padding was done if next member would not begin at an alignment fitting to its own size or would overlap the required alignment. so an 4-byte integer always would begin at a 4-byte segment. a single char can begin at next byte regardless of alignment.  

struct PAD 
{
   UINT32 a;
   UINT32 b;
   UINT64 c;
   char d[5];
   char e;
   short f;
   UINT32 g;
};

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4|8|16|21|22|24|32

you see the char e begins at an odd byte and short f very well can be put packed between e and g.

Sara
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