?
Solved

Why does Visual Studio seem to ignore my include file directives?

Posted on 2013-06-20
2
Medium Priority
?
397 Views
Last Modified: 2013-06-20
I'm getting an error in Visual Studio on something that should be very simple.

In the following code, cout is flagged as undefined when I attempt to compile.

#include <iostream>
#include "stdafx.h"

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
	cout << "Hello World\n";
	return 0;
}

Open in new window


I tried <iostream.h>, I tried putting the include in stdafx.h, all to no avail.  The compiler keeps telling me that cout is undefined; if I press f12 while selecting cout, it tells me the symbol is defined in iostream.h.  But intellisense says cout is undefined and the compiler gives an error indicating cout is undefined.

This is inside a WIN32 Console application. The source code above is the complete contents of test.cpp.

The error message is:
Error      2      error C2065: 'cout' : undeclared identifier
0
Comment
Question by:Ryan94114
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
2 Comments
 
LVL 86

Accepted Solution

by:
jkr earned 2000 total points
ID: 39264624
The reason is two-fold:

a) 'StdAfx.h' has to be the very first file to be included
b) you are using 'cout' without adding the std namespace to your code

So, there are basically two ways to do that:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
	std::cout << "Hello World\n";
	return 0;
}
                                  

Open in new window


or

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
	cout << "Hello World\n";
	return 0;
}
                                  

Open in new window

0
 
LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:brendanmeyer
ID: 39264631
either add: just below the includes
using namespace std;

Open in new window


or on ever occurrence of cout use:
std::cout

Open in new window

0

Featured Post

What does it mean to be "Always On"?

Is your cloud always on? With an Always On cloud you won't have to worry about downtime for maintenance or software application code updates, ensuring that your bottom line isn't affected.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Often, when implementing a feature, you won't know how certain events should be handled at the point where they occur and you'd rather defer to the user of your function or class. For example, a XML parser will extract a tag from the source code, wh…
Introduction This article is the first in a series of articles about the C/C++ Visual Studio Express debugger.  It provides a quick start guide in using the debugger. Part 2 focuses on additional topics in breakpoints.  Lastly, Part 3 focuses on th…
The goal of the video will be to teach the user the concept of local variables and scope. An example of a locally defined variable will be given as well as an explanation of what scope is in C++. The local variable and concept of scope will be relat…
The viewer will learn how to pass data into a function in C++. This is one step further in using functions. Instead of only printing text onto the console, the function will be able to perform calculations with argumentents given by the user.
Suggested Courses

770 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question