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Dynamic SQL Called for?

Posted on 2013-06-21
5
349 Views
Last Modified: 2013-06-21
I just received a solution from a couple of experts for a PIVOT Query.

Works...I'm happy.

Is there a way to do this cleaner and with much less SQL with a Dynamic Query?

Here's the select

declare		@CallData table(CallDTTM datetime, [CallLength] NUMERIC(4,1), CallDirection VARCHAR(30));
insert into @CallData values ('2013-06-10 00:23:30.000', 100.0,'Outbound');
insert into @CallData values ('2013-06-10 00:24:30.000', 105.0,'Outbound');
insert into @CallData values ('2013-06-10 10:23:30.000', 223.0,'Outbound');
insert into @CallData values ('2013-06-10 12:23:30.000', 35.0,'Outbound');
insert into @CallData values ('2013-06-10 14:23:30.000', 44.0,'Outbound');
insert into @CallData values ('2013-06-11 00:23:30.000', 62.0,'Outbound');
insert into @CallData values ('2013-06-11 10:23:30.000', 75.0,'Outbound');
insert into @CallData values ('2013-06-11 12:23:30.000', 302.0,'Outbound');
insert into @CallData values ('2013-06-11 14:23:30.000', 44.0,'Outbound');


DECLARE @callDate AS DATETIME
SET @CallDate = CONVERT(VARCHAR(10),'06/09/2013',101)

DECLARE @CallDirection	VARCHAR(30)
SET		@CallDirection = 'Outbound'

SELECT	CallDate	
		, ISNULL([0],0) [0]
		, ISNULL([1],0) [1]
		, ISNULL([2],0) [2] 
		, ISNULL([3],0) [3]
		, ISNULL([4],0) [4]
		, ISNULL([5],0) [5] 
		, ISNULL([6],0) [6]
		, ISNULL([7],0) [7]
		, ISNULL([8],0) [8] 
		, ISNULL([9],0) [9] 
		, ISNULL([10],0) [10] 
		, ISNULL([11],0) [11]
		, ISNULL([12],0) [12] 
		, ISNULL([13],0) [13]
		, ISNULL([14],0) [14]
		, ISNULL([15],0) [15]
		, ISNULL([16],0) [16]
		, ISNULL([17],0) [17]
		, ISNULL([18],0) [18]
		, ISNULL([19],0) [19]
		, ISNULL([20],0) [20]
		, ISNULL([21],0) [21]
		, ISNULL([22],0) [22]
		, ISNULL([23],0) [23]
FROM	
		(
			SELECT	REPLACE(LEFT(CONVERT(VARCHAR, t1.CallDTTM, 13), 11), ' ', '-')	CallDate
					, DATEPART(HOUR,t1.CallDTTM) as HourFrom
					, ISNULL(t1.[CallLength],0) /60 [Minutes]
			FROM	@CallData t1
		) p1
PIVOT	
		(
			SUM([Minutes])
			FOR	HourFrom in 
				(
					[0], [1], [2], [3],
					[4], [5], [6], [7], 
					[8], [9], [10], [11], 
					[12], [13], [14], [15], 
					[16], [17], [18], [19],
					[20], [21], [22], [23])
		) AS pt1	

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Question by:lrbrister
  • 2
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5 Comments
 
LVL 65

Accepted Solution

by:
Jim Horn earned 500 total points
ID: 39266732
With dynamic SQL, no not really.

It would make sense though to make @CallData into a physical table, so your SQL can be just one SELECT, and the values in CallData aren't hard-coded in this T-SQL.

Just my opinion.
Jim
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:lrbrister
ID: 39266861
Thanks.
Yeah...I had the @CallData in here just so there was example data

It actually connects to CallData
0
 
LVL 65

Expert Comment

by:Jim Horn
ID: 39266874
Thanks for the grade.  Good luck with your project.  -Jim
0
 
LVL 32

Expert Comment

by:bhess1
ID: 39267064
A tiny simplification (not related to your question):  If you replace the 13 format in the Convert statement with a 106 format instead, you can remove the LEFT part of that statement.  Alternately, by selecting a VARCHAR(11) format, you will only return the date portion of the 13 formatted datetime.

As for your question in a dynamically formatted query - that depends on how you look at things.  The query below depends on some additional tables existing in permanent form - an Hours table containing the values 0 to 23 (or, alternately, an existing tally table with a limit of 0 to 23 on the SELECT statement), and a working table for the data extracted from the source table (called CallHoursReportData below.)

The CallHoursReportData table is defined as:
CREATE TABLE CallHoursReportData (
	SPID smallint,
	CallDate varchar(11),
	HourFrom smallint,
	CallLength decimal(9,4),
	CONSTRAINT pk_CallHoursReportData PRIMARY KEY (SPID, CallDate, HourFrom)
	)

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The Hours table I worked with was defined as:
CREATE TABLE Hours (hr smallint PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED,
	sHr AS (CAST(hr AS varchar(2))))

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Assuming these tables exist, and the Hours table is populated, then you can use this query to generate your SQL and run the report:
DELETE FROM CallHoursReportData
	WHERE SPID = @@SPID

INSERT INTO CallHoursReportData
SELECT 
	@@SPID,
	CallDate, 
	HourFrom,
	SUM(Minutes) AS CallLength
FROM (
	SELECT	REPLACE(CONVERT(VARCHAR, t1.CallDTTM, 106), ' ','-')	CallDate
		, DATEPART(HOUR,t1.CallDTTM) as HourFrom
		, ISNULL(t1.[CallLength],0) /60 [Minutes]
	FROM callData AS t1
	)	src
GROUP BY 
	CallDate, 
	HourFrom

DECLARE @sql1 varchar(4000)
DECLARE @sql2 varchar(1000)

SET @SQL1 = 'SELECT CallDate '

SELECT 
	@SQL1 = @SQL1 + ',ISNULL([' + sHr + '],0) [' + sHr + '] ',
	@SQL2 = ISNULL(@SQL2 + ',', '') + '[' + sHr + '] '
	FROM HOURS h
	ORDER BY h.hr

SET @SQL1 = @SQL1 + 'FROM CallHoursReportData PIVOT(SUM(CallLength) FOR HourFrom in (' + @sql2 + ')) as pt1  WHERE SPID=@@SPID'

EXEC (@SQL1)

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The query that this generates, when reformatted to be readable, should look familiar to you:
SELECT 
	CallDate ,
	ISNULL([0],0) [0] ,
	ISNULL([1],0) [1] ,
	ISNULL([2],0) [2] ,
	ISNULL([3],0) [3] ,
	ISNULL([4],0) [4] ,
	ISNULL([5],0) [5] ,
	ISNULL([6],0) [6] ,
	ISNULL([7],0) [7] ,
	ISNULL([8],0) [8] ,
	ISNULL([9],0) [9] ,
	ISNULL([10],0) [10] ,
	ISNULL([11],0) [11] ,
	ISNULL([12],0) [12] ,
	ISNULL([13],0) [13] ,
	ISNULL([14],0) [14] ,
	ISNULL([15],0) [15] ,
	ISNULL([16],0) [16] ,
	ISNULL([17],0) [17] ,
	ISNULL([18],0) [18] ,
	ISNULL([19],0) [19] ,
	ISNULL([20],0) [20] ,
	ISNULL([21],0) [21] ,
	ISNULL([22],0) [22] ,
	ISNULL([23],0) [23] 
FROM CallHoursReportData 
PIVOT(
	SUM(CallLength) 
	FOR HourFrom in (
		[0] ,[1] ,[2] ,[3] ,[4] ,[5] ,
		[6] ,[7] ,[8] ,[9] ,[10] ,[11] ,
		[12] ,[13] ,[14] ,[15] ,[16] ,[17] ,
		[18] ,[19] ,[20] ,[21] ,[22] ,[23] 
		)
	) as pt1  
WHERE SPID=@@SPID

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The biggest differences are the source of the data (the pre-summarized CallHoursReportData file) and the WHERE clause on the processes @@SPID value.@@SPID value.
0
 

Author Comment

by:lrbrister
ID: 39267100
bhess1,

  Thanks for the follow-up
0

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