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Server 2008 R2 recovering orphaned files after changing one of the failed non RAID disk.

Hi there,

I have a server on win 2008 r2. RAID 10.  I replaced the dedicated windows back up HD(non Raid).

When I powered the server up it told me that it is inserting index to index $0 it passes that stage after that recovering orphaned files and it has been an hour now running. Im not sure if I am waiting for something good or something worse.
I'm kind of wondering is this Normal? what should I be looking for after this recovery?
Hopefully it goes to windows.

Please help. I'm nervous.
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1 Solution
Yes be very afraid, especially if you have a fakeraid controller.

It is either now confused about the RAID config and destroying everything, or doing a reconstruction because the system wasn't shut down properly.  Let it finish and hope for the best.  If these drives are 2TB then you won't know till evening.

Moving forward, IF this is a fakeraid, you should configure as a pair of native windows software RAID1s.   That  will be maybe 3X faster than what you have now.
mod2incAuthor Commented:

Thanks for your time to reply.
its a 500GB. Definitely not a fake raid.

I will see and post what ever happens.

still. worried.
then likely a deep recovery rebuild.   If you don't have enterprise class disk drives then even 1 bad block could take well over 30 seconds.  You have 1 trillion blocks.  Do the math.

(But if you had enterprise class drives, then rebuilds would be faster and you would have at least 10x better error recovery so even the odds of bad blocks are much less.  Enterprise class drives guarantee recovery in 2-3 seconds per block)
mod2incAuthor Commented:
The process finished after 6hrs.
was able to boot to windows.
all files were intact and can modify files.

Open Manage shows 1 virtual disk failed.
Should I delete this? Or what should be the procedure to fix this?
Any suggestions?
If the virtual disk failed then you had too much data loss for the controller to be able to make sense of it.   Blow it away and restore from backup.  I also suggest going with higher quality drives and due diligence by running regular data consistency checks.

(If data and availability is vital, then go RAID6 which offers additional redundancy).
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