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how to check users and roles

Posted on 2013-06-24
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Last Modified: 2013-06-25
I have two sql server 2012 databases, once is a copy of the other but the data in the second one has been changed.

I can log into either database through the Server Management Studio using Windows authentication and update the databases.

However, when I connect through MS Access using a login (myacclogin (a user who is a member of db_owner)) which exists in both databases I get different results between the two databases.

In the first one, mylivedata, I can open up a table and update it.

In the second one, myarchivedata, clicking on the table link does not return any records.

As far as I can tell the permissions for the user are the same in both databases but can someone tell me how I can view what these permissions are so that I can check them.
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Question by:Nemetona
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Guru Ji earned 500 total points
ID: 39272291
run the following query against your database and you will can compare both users permissions and see whats difference. The following works for SQL Server 2008 , I don't have 2012 to try it out.

/*
Security Audit Report
1) List all access provisioned to a sql user or windows user/group directly 
2) List all access provisioned to a sql user or windows user/group through a database or application role
3) List all access provisioned to the public role

Columns Returned:
UserName        : SQL or Windows/Active Directory user cccount.  This could also be an Active Directory group.
UserType        : Value will be either 'SQL User' or 'Windows User'.  This reflects the type of user defined for the 
                  SQL Server user account.
DatabaseUserName: Name of the associated user as defined in the database user account.  The database user may not be the
                  same as the server user.
Role            : The role name.  This will be null if the associated permissions to the object are defined at directly
                  on the user account, otherwise this will be the name of the role that the user is a member of.
PermissionType  : Type of permissions the user/role has on an object. Examples could include CONNECT, EXECUTE, SELECT
                  DELETE, INSERT, ALTER, CONTROL, TAKE OWNERSHIP, VIEW DEFINITION, etc.
                  This value may not be populated for all roles.  Some built in roles have implicit permission
                  definitions.
PermissionState : Reflects the state of the permission type, examples could include GRANT, DENY, etc.
                  This value may not be populated for all roles.  Some built in roles have implicit permission
                  definitions.
ObjectType      : Type of object the user/role is assigned permissions on.  Examples could include USER_TABLE, 
                  SQL_SCALAR_FUNCTION, SQL_INLINE_TABLE_VALUED_FUNCTION, SQL_STORED_PROCEDURE, VIEW, etc.   
                  This value may not be populated for all roles.  Some built in roles have implicit permission
                  definitions.          
ObjectName      : Name of the object that the user/role is assigned permissions on.  
                  This value may not be populated for all roles.  Some built in roles have implicit permission
                  definitions.
ColumnName      : Name of the column of the object that the user/role is assigned permissions on. This value
                  is only populated if the object is a table, view or a table value function.                 
*/

--List all access provisioned to a sql user or windows user/group directly 
SELECT  
    [UserName] = CASE princ.[type] 
                    WHEN 'S' THEN princ.[name]
                    WHEN 'U' THEN ulogin.[name] COLLATE Latin1_General_CI_AI
                 END,
    [UserType] = CASE princ.[type]
                    WHEN 'S' THEN 'SQL User'
                    WHEN 'U' THEN 'Windows User'
                 END,  
    [DatabaseUserName] = princ.[name],       
    [Role] = null,      
    [PermissionType] = perm.[permission_name],       
    [PermissionState] = perm.[state_desc],       
    [ObjectType] = obj.type_desc,--perm.[class_desc],       
    [ObjectName] = OBJECT_NAME(perm.major_id),
    [ColumnName] = col.[name]
FROM    
    --database user
    sys.database_principals princ  
LEFT JOIN
    --Login accounts
    sys.login_token ulogin on princ.[sid] = ulogin.[sid]
LEFT JOIN        
    --Permissions
    sys.database_permissions perm ON perm.[grantee_principal_id] = princ.[principal_id]
LEFT JOIN
    --Table columns
    sys.columns col ON col.[object_id] = perm.major_id 
                    AND col.[column_id] = perm.[minor_id]
LEFT JOIN
    sys.objects obj ON perm.[major_id] = obj.[object_id]
WHERE 
    princ.[type] in ('S','U')
UNION
--List all access provisioned to a sql user or windows user/group through a database or application role
SELECT  
    [UserName] = CASE memberprinc.[type] 
                    WHEN 'S' THEN memberprinc.[name]
                    WHEN 'U' THEN ulogin.[name] COLLATE Latin1_General_CI_AI
                 END,
    [UserType] = CASE memberprinc.[type]
                    WHEN 'S' THEN 'SQL User'
                    WHEN 'U' THEN 'Windows User'
                 END, 
    [DatabaseUserName] = memberprinc.[name],   
    [Role] = roleprinc.[name],      
    [PermissionType] = perm.[permission_name],       
    [PermissionState] = perm.[state_desc],       
    [ObjectType] = obj.type_desc,--perm.[class_desc],   
    [ObjectName] = OBJECT_NAME(perm.major_id),
    [ColumnName] = col.[name]
FROM    
    --Role/member associations
    sys.database_role_members members
JOIN
    --Roles
    sys.database_principals roleprinc ON roleprinc.[principal_id] = members.[role_principal_id]
JOIN
    --Role members (database users)
    sys.database_principals memberprinc ON memberprinc.[principal_id] = members.[member_principal_id]
LEFT JOIN
    --Login accounts
    sys.login_token ulogin on memberprinc.[sid] = ulogin.[sid]
LEFT JOIN        
    --Permissions
    sys.database_permissions perm ON perm.[grantee_principal_id] = roleprinc.[principal_id]
LEFT JOIN
    --Table columns
    sys.columns col on col.[object_id] = perm.major_id 
                    AND col.[column_id] = perm.[minor_id]
LEFT JOIN
    sys.objects obj ON perm.[major_id] = obj.[object_id]
UNION
--List all access provisioned to the public role, which everyone gets by default
SELECT  
    [UserName] = '{All Users}',
    [UserType] = '{All Users}', 
    [DatabaseUserName] = '{All Users}',       
    [Role] = roleprinc.[name],      
    [PermissionType] = perm.[permission_name],       
    [PermissionState] = perm.[state_desc],       
    [ObjectType] = obj.type_desc,--perm.[class_desc],  
    [ObjectName] = OBJECT_NAME(perm.major_id),
    [ColumnName] = col.[name]
FROM    
    --Roles
    sys.database_principals roleprinc
LEFT JOIN        
    --Role permissions
    sys.database_permissions perm ON perm.[grantee_principal_id] = roleprinc.[principal_id]
LEFT JOIN
    --Table columns
    sys.columns col on col.[object_id] = perm.major_id 
                    AND col.[column_id] = perm.[minor_id]                   
JOIN 
    --All objects   
    sys.objects obj ON obj.[object_id] = perm.[major_id]
WHERE
    --Only roles
    roleprinc.[type] = 'R' AND
    --Only public role
    roleprinc.[name] = 'public' AND
    --Only objects of ours, not the MS objects
    obj.is_ms_shipped = 0
ORDER BY
    princ.[Name],
    OBJECT_NAME(perm.major_id),
    col.[name],
    perm.[permission_name],
    perm.[state_desc],
    obj.type_desc--perm.[class_desc] 

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Author Closing Comment

by:Nemetona
ID: 39274427
Thank you for that, it showed me the permissions although unfortunately, it did not solve my problem.
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