Go Premium for a chance to win a PS4. Enter to Win

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 880
  • Last Modified:

Dell Powerconnect 5448 LAG. How to verify it works.

I think I configured LAG correctly on my Dell powerconnect 5448 after going over the manual carefully with 6 ports to another Dell 5448. But the LEDs on the LAG ports blinks separately. I remember that the LEDs blink together if the ports are in LAG configuration. How do I verify the LAG is configured and working properly?

Also, if 6 ports are in LAG, when frame is sent, does LAG do load balancing or bundling the bandwidth so that frame is divided and is sent in multiple paths(I don't know how it can do, but...). If it's load balancing, what's the difference between just hooking up 6 ports between the two switches without LAG? switch finds any empty path to send to next switch, doesn't it?
0
crcsupport
Asked:
crcsupport
1 Solution
 
TimotiStCommented:
LEDs usually blink if they send/receive traffic; I've never seen a switch where the ports in a LAG had to blink at the same time. Still, not impossible.
You could post a config or screencap of your configuration, so we can check your LAG setup.

If you simply connect 2 switches with 6 cables, 2 things can happen:
- unmanaged switches: you just formed a loop and the network dies.
- managed switches: they usually run spannnig-tree by default, and they disable 5 out of the 6 links, to avoid a loop.

Traffic distribution on a LAG depends on the switch, usually it's done based on a hash value of the source and destination IP addresses, or MAC addresses. Some switches also take the TCP/UDP port numbers into the hashing. If you have varied traffic on your network, this gives reasonable load-balancing.
One thing you won't be able to do is get 2 servers to talk to each other over 1 TCP connection at 6Gbps.

Tamas
0

Featured Post

 The Evil-ution of Network Security Threats

What are the hacks that forever changed the security industry? To answer that question, we created an exciting new eBook that takes you on a trip through hacking history. It explores the top hacks from the 80s to 2010s, why they mattered, and how the security industry responded.

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now