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DNS Question

Posted on 2013-06-24
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Last Modified: 2013-07-15
Okay so I've dealt a lot with simply putting entries into DNS for internal usage. For example we have IP cameras that I added DNS entries for and gave them names instead of using IP addresses. However we are doing something a little more advanced now.

Our Internal DNS server sits on a SBS 2010

We installing a new server that host a certain application that will run on our network. It will be used internally, but also it will be used externally. Apparently it will be a website the users will be able to log into.

On my part I was asked to do the following:

The server name will be test.example.org  Can you add that name to your external DNS server and internal DNS server?  The external should be pointed to a reachable public IP address and the internal would point to the local IP subnet.


Okay I can easily do the linking of the IP address to the internal name, but what is a external DNS? And how do I go about that making it reachable with our public IP? I know my public IP if that helps.
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Question by:Pancake_Effect
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by:CITG_Carl
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OK, do you own your own external domain? Usually whoever registered your dns server name, handle your external DNS.

If you send them a request to setup an A record, and point to whichever external IP address they should be able to set that up for you

Cheers
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by:Pancake_Effect
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How do I view to see if I even have a external domain setup? I'm just not familiar with the terminology or concept of external domains. I just personally deal with our business internal dns for example site. Local
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by:CITG_Carl
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OK, if you run a 'whois' against the external DNS name, that should tell you the provider it is with. Usually its with an ISP such as demon or BT?

Cheers
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by:Pancake_Effect
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Oh are you saying that a external DNS is just another term for a service such as www.godaddy.com?
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by:CITG_Carl
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No external DNS is the same as internal DNS. Its the method you resolve domain names to ip addresses. Only it works on the public networks.

If you ping www.google.co.uk, you will obviously return back an IP address. So for your domain, you need to find who owns the domain, and ask them to create an A record for the record you require

Cheers
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by:Pancake_Effect
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We don't even have a website, so how do we even know anyone is hosting anything to begin with?
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by:CITG_Carl
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Do you have an domain then? If you havent got an external domain name then you either need to purchase one or dont use an external dns name. Just access the resource direct to IP address
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by:Pancake_Effect
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We have a local domain for active directory and group policy purposes.

This application will be used internally AND externally.

I guess that was kind of my main question, what is a external DNS? I'm not well versed in DNS terminology, but I've figured it out how to work on them usually trial by fire.

But you stated purchase, so it sounds like again a external DNS is just another word for a DNS hosting site like godaddy.com? Because I've set up one of those before for a personally web server of mine at home if that's the case.
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by:Alan3285
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Hi,

If someone sends an email to a person in your business, look at the email address they use - the part after the @ is your domain.

It is also possible that you don't have your own domain, and you use someone else's (like gmail) in which case your email address(es) will be something like:

mybusinessname@gmail.com


In your first post, you said:

The server name will be test.example.org  Can you add that name to your external DNS server and internal DNS server?  The external should be pointed to a reachable public IP address and the internal would point to the local IP subnet

Accepting that you changed the domain to example.org for the purposes of posting here, whatever it really is, that is your (external) domain name.

If you do already have a public domain, somebody (and ISP usually) is hosting your domain name, and they are likely also providing your public DNS service on their own DNS servers.  It is them you need to contact and ask them to add an 'A' record for test.example.org (changing example.org back to whatever it really is), and point it to whatever publically routable IP you are wanting to use.

HTH,

Alan.
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by:Pancake_Effect
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Our e-mail system is hosted externally.

If I host a external domain name, example.org at Godaddy.com for example, do I have to involve the ISP at all?

Our computers (around 50) point to our gatewat, a Cisco 5510, which uses Google's DNS servers. When we set them up, we didn't use our ISP's because they're always seems to go down.

I remember way back in the day we had to call the ISP about changing a DNS entry for our mail server (This was before we outsourced the mail servers to headquarters) because we changed the domain name. So we changed the MX record here locally on our DNS server that's hosted on the SBS 2010, but it wasn't working, so again as mentioned earlier we had to call the ISP to update their record..Not sure if that had to do anything with this situation.

Can I simply just host the new domain on godaddy, then port forward it to the server located on our site?
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Alan3285 earned 500 total points
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Hi,

Just to avoid confusion:

example.org is a domain
test.example.org is a subdomain of example.org (rather than a new domain)

If you already own example.org, then you want to create a new subdomain (test.example.org).

To do that, you (probably) need to go to your existing domain host, who we can only guess at this point, is hosting your public DNS records (for example.org and any existing subdomains), and ask them to add a new A record for the subdomain (test.example.org) and point it to whatever IP address you want it to point at.

Our e-mail system is hosted externally.

The fact that your email is hosted externally does not make any difference to the above.

If I host a external domain name, example.org at Godaddy.com for example, do I have to involve the ISP at all?

No - the two can be completely separate.  Many people use their ISP purely for convenience (they already have an account with them), but you can keep it separate, and personally I always prefer to do so.

Our computers (around 50) point to our gatewat, a Cisco 5510, which uses Google's DNS servers. When we set them up, we didn't use our ISP's because they're always seems to go down.

Who you use to resolve public DNS records has no bearing on the above - you can use Google (8.8.8.8) or OpenDNS or your ISP or whoever you choose.

I remember way back in the day we had to call the ISP about changing a DNS entry for our mail server (This was before we outsourced the mail servers to headquarters) because we changed the domain name. So we changed the MX record here locally on our DNS server that's hosted on the SBS 2010, but it wasn't working, so again as mentioned earlier we had to call the ISP to update their record..Not sure if that had to do anything with this situation.

You have not yet been explicit as to whether you even already have your own domain name, but I am inferring from this statement that you do.  If you had to talk to your ISP about changing MX records (a specific type of DNS record), then your ISP must have been hosting your public DNS records at that point in time.

If you do already have a domain (example.org using your original post), then you need to get test.example.org added as I set out above.


Can I simply just host the new domain on godaddy, then port forward it to the server located on our site?

You can create a new domain with any registrar (GoDaddy is one option), and they will also offer to host the public DNS records for that new domain.

External users (or more specifically, the application(s) they are using) will aim packets at the IP address that you associate with test.example.org, and at a specific port.  That port is determined by the user / application, not by DNS.  For example, a web browser would normally aim packets at ports 80 or 443 on the IP address, but you can instruct your browser to aim at any port you like - 80 and 443 are just the defaults for http and https respectively.

There is no concept of 'port forwarding' with respect to your public DNS records.  Port forwarding is something you would do on your equipment (router) at the point of entry into your infrastructure.


HTH,

Alan.
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by:Pancake_Effect
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Thank you very much, that was very clear. I ended up having to start a new domain on GoDaddy for it to work, but now I understand how the process works. Thanks!
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by:Alan3285
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Glad it worked out for you :-)
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