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Hyper-V Core Performance RAID 5 vs. RAID 6

Posted on 2013-06-25
  • Server Hardware
  • Storage Hardware
  • Storage
  • Hyper-V
  • Dell
  • +1
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Last Modified: 2016-12-08
I am spec'ing out new servers for a couple of regional offices.  On each server (Dell PowerEdge T420) I plan to run MS Server 2012 Hyper-V Core and then virtualize 4 servers: an RODC, print server, file server (for IT files), local image server, and a win 7 test machine.

I am looking at using a PERC H710 with 1GB Cache and two arrays:
1st: RAID 1, 2 146GB SAS 15k 6Gbps (hyper visor)
2nd: RAID 6 5 300GB SAS 15k 6Gbps (all vm's)

I am going with two quad core processors and was planning on 32GB RAM.

My question is this:

Is RAID 6, with it's two write operations, best suited here?  This is a regional office and really only uses their local server to connect to headquarters via WAN - hence the RODC.  The only thing that I need locally is a print server and the file server that will be used by IT when we need to push out 3rd party updates.  I think that RAID 10 might be a bit faster- but the regional offices are far from HQ and hard to service in the event of an emergency so I tend to want to go with redundancy over performance so long as the hit isn't to bad.

From what I have read here so far- it seems to me as though I can expect the same or better read times from R6 but writes will be slower by a constant value due to the second parity disk.  RAID 10 on the other hand will be faster, but require 2 more disks to get the same space if I want to have a hot spare.  If I use RAID 6 and have a failure- I can always wait until after business hours to do the rebuild as I have enough redundancy.

Realizing that this may be a bit of religious debate- I am interested to hear what the community at Experts Exchange think.

Thank you!
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Question by:EJIT
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Eddie-Lopez earned 250 total points
ID: 39276586
Hi,

There is no right or wrong in RAID selection, it depends entirely on your needs. If faster disk writing is the top priority in your business, then RAID 5 is the right choice. If disk disk writing is not that important, but data protection is, then go for RAID 6.

And then RAID 10 would give you a boost in both I/O speed and protection, but it is a more expensive choice (since your usable disk space will be less).

I would say if you can afford the extra disks, go with RAID 10 and get the best of both worlds. If not, then make a choice between RAID 5 and 6 based on what's stated above.

Best Regards,

Eddie
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Expert Comment

by:Gerald Connolly
ID: 39285645
I think you are looking at this the wrong way? You should not be concentrating on performance, but on, will my data be available when i want it to be? even under fault conditions.

With todays big disks it is imperative that you use either RAID10 or RAID-6 for mission critical applications
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