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getter and setter for List<  >?

Posted on 2013-06-28
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Last Modified: 2013-06-28
I am not familiar with this syntax.

What is happening here with the getter and setter just sort of tacked on the end?

protected List<MerchantStates> merchantStates { get; set; }

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Question by:knowlton
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by:käµfm³d 👽
ID: 39285817
It's an "automatic" property. It saves you from having to do this:

private List<MerchantStates> _merchStates;

protected List<MerchantStates> merchantStates
{
    get { return this._merchStates; }
    set { this._merchStates = value; }
}

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by:knowlton
ID: 39285826
I see:

In C# 3.0 and later, auto-implemented properties make property-declaration more concise when no additional logic is required in the property accessors. They also enable client code to create objects. When you declare a property as shown in the following example, the compiler creates a private, anonymous backing field that can only be accessed through the property's get and set accessors.



But List<  >   already has Add(   )

Why would you need a setter?
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käµfm³d   👽 earned 500 total points
ID: 39285831
You're not modifying List<>; you're having the compiler create the equivalent of what I displayed above. If you do not use the { get; set; } syntax, then you have to do what I demonstrated in the snippet above. That is, you have to create a backing field (i.e. private member variable) that the property makes reference to. In this case, the backing field just happens to be of type List<MerchantStates>.

Because we've declared both a get and set, we can now do:

classInstance.merchantStates  = new List<MerchantStates>();

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The fact that we used "{ get; set; }" doesn't affect this--we could have used the expanded version I demonstrated above.
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Author Closing Comment

by:knowlton
ID: 39285838
Okay - I understand better now.

Wow - that is kinda cool.  : )

I'll have to remember this!
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