NetApp: Cluster Failover and Rebooting

Posted on 2013-06-29
Medium Priority
Last Modified: 2013-06-30
Our company just moved to a new building so I had to shutdown our NetApp and VMware Infrastructure. When I was shutting down the NetApp (FAS2240), I issued CF disable command. When I brought the NetApp back up, I forgot to issue CF enable, and just left. I then started getting phone calls when the other engineers started to turn ON the ESXi hosts saying all the VMs say they are inaccessible. The host configuration, under storage showed only local storage, and could not detect the NetApp NFS volumes. I could not confirm this myself, because I was not there.

When I cam back, I issued the CF enable command, and so far, things are looking OK, and I was able to boot up several VMs, and am able to see NetApp volumes in VSphere.

Is it possible that the "CF enable" command is necessary before turning ON the VMs? If so, why?

Question by:pzozulka
LVL 126

Assisted Solution

by:Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2) earned 664 total points
ID: 39286523
It would appear that when you failed over the cluster NetApp heads, the ESXi servers did not have access to the NFS datastore (NetApp volume/lun/export) on the other clustered node until you failed back (e.g. giveback).

So how is your NetApp filer heads configured? usually, the other NetApp clustered head (passive controller) would take over the IP Address of the other filer, so although there would be a small hiccup in access, NFS access would continue.

In your case, when you failed over, (takeover), the other head did not impersonate the other head, and hence you had an outgae, until you gaveback the resources.
LVL 42

Assisted Solution

by:Paul Solovyovsky
Paul Solovyovsky earned 1336 total points
ID: 39286759
If both controllers are up and running "cf enable" is not needed to run.  

How did you configure the interfaces for the controllers?  If you had used OnCommand System Manager there is a known issue that corrupts the rc file if you don't use command line, it manifests itself after reboot.
LVL 22

Expert Comment

ID: 39287077
The only way to know exactly what happened, is to study the system logs on each node. Look for any errors that point to configuration problems. Look closely at the log entries at the time you issued the cf enable.
LVL 42

Accepted Solution

Paul Solovyovsky earned 1336 total points
ID: 39287163
BTW, the correct way to do reboot each controller non disruptively is to use "cf takeover/cf giveback"  otherwise you'll lose the resources on the node.  cf takeover allows you to reboot each controller at a time without disruption

Author Comment

ID: 39288419
Hmm...not sure what happened then..I probably should have checked to verify that the ESXi hosts were not seeing the NetApp before issuing the CF ENABLE command, because the way I did it made it seem as if that was the magical fix since right after that I logged into VMware and was able to see the NetApp volumes.

Since this was a company move, we had to shutdown the NetApp entirely for several hours, so "cf takeover/cf giveback" was not an option. But thanks for the tip, as it might come in handy in the near future.

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