How do I expand disk space on SCO Unix running as VM under HyperV?

Hi,
I am running SCO Unix Openserver v5.07V as a VM under HyperV on a Windows 2008 R2 server.  It is running great.  The problem is, it is only running with a 6GB virtual disk.  I changed the VM settings to increase the virtual disk size under HyperV to be 100GB, but how do I get SCO Unix to recognize that additional disk space?

Thank you for any help in advance,
Jeff
jgrammer42Asked:
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skullnobrainsCommented:
i really could not find a tool that will do this, and since we both looked rather thoroughly, it may not be feasible.

i can see a few courses of action from here (ordered by worse to better in my very subjective opinion)

- find a live cd or install another sco version on a separate disk of the VM that does provide the tool. i think htfs from all sco versions are the same but i'd double-check this part beforehand

- backup, create a big partition and restore (possibly to a different vm). if you do not have a (likely commercial) backup program that will save/restore the boot code, you can use dd to grab the first 512 bytes of the disk, grab boot0 elsewhere or use a boot disk available on ftp.sco.com so you can fix the boot sequence.

- same as above but create an extra virtual disk and simply move stuff from a virtual disk to the other and then destroy the small one. it is likely that a cp command + a dd for the boot0 sector will do the trick. i'm unsure about the location or existence of boot1 code, the actual boot program should be /boot

- i still think the simplest by far is to do what i suggested previously which is add an extra partition instead of resizing the existing one. you probably can move all the data from your client's application on a separate partition and leave the root partition with the operating system as is.

sorry you spent time resizing the partition : i wrongly assumed that there would be a relatively simple way to grow an htfs filesystem on your SCO version. maybe there is and we just don't know about it. you may want to ask for other people to review the question : maybe there is someone around that knows about that stuff.

best regards

ps : SCO is by no way a linux distro but i guess you meant unix version rather than linux distro
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skullnobrainsCommented:
fdisk should let you expand the partition

divvy or vxassist should let you expand the partition division

fsadm will let you resize the filesystem

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vxresize if available should cover both last steps
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jgrammer42Author Commented:
skullnobrains,

I am not familiar with those utilities.  I have extensive experience with Linux flavors, but SCO Unix is a little different.

And I booted up in System mode run level and I do not have fsadm, vxassist or vxresize.

Divvy is there, but I do not know how to use that.  

I did run fdisk and increased the block size there.

Any help on running divvy?

Thank you,
Jeff
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skullnobrainsCommented:
i'm not very familiar with sco either (i'mmore of a freebsd or solaris guy when it comes to unix) but nevertheless this should do

- BACKUP IMPORTANT STUFF (cloning the whole machine seeems reasonable)
- start divvy interactively (without args)
- select your root filesystem (you should only have one)
- use the "e" command to change the end block to the highest possible value
- use the "p" command and make sure the "new filesystem" column is set to "no"
- commit changes

you may also want to consider creating an additional filesystem and mounting it. there is little advantage in using a single filesystem. if you're familiar with linux, i assume you grasp the concepts, and can do it in a more secure way

which filesystem do you use ? there are specific growfs-like commands for many of them
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jgrammer42Author Commented:
skullnobrains,
well, I am not doing something right.  I ran divvy in system mode, and set the ending blocks to something much greater, hit "q" to quit and then "i" to install.  It shows the full ending block size defined, yet, when I start up SCO Unix in operating run level 2, and then run dfspace, it still is only showing the original 6gb of space.  It should be MUCH greater than that.  I will try and do a screen capture this evening and post it.  Maybe you can see something I am doing wrong.

(Oh, divvy shows "root" as being an "HTFS" file system.)

I will post back later,
jeff
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skullnobrainsCommented:
dfspace displays the size of the filesystem. as long as you do not grow the filesystem, you will no see a difference.
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jgrammer42Author Commented:
skullnobrains,
I apologize for being so ignorant, but how do I do that under SCO Unix?  with Linux I would just use the resize2fs command, but that is not available under SCO Unix.

thank you,
jeff
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skullnobrainsCommented:
don't apologise. i should be the one apologising since i probably don't know SCO much more than you do, though i recollect a few things, and actually i will and have been browsing the internet trying to help you out.

i assume the fsadm command is completely unavailable ? can you check ? maybe after a regular boot ?
many commands are different across versions and apparently the commandset is very different between unixware and openserver series but fsadm should be available as far as i know on openserver

actually, i'm pretty astonished you are using SCO at all if you're not familiar with it in the first place.
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jgrammer42Author Commented:
no worries, I greatly appreciate the help!

I cannot find fsadm at all on the system.  Frankly I would be using some other Linux distro, but this is a client that has an application that the vendor only supports under SCO Unix.

Thank you,
Jeff
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jgrammer42Author Commented:
skullnobrains,
Thank you again for all of your help.  Yeah, I may try and do that then.

Luckily, I was not trying to do this on a production VM, I cloned the original VM and was working with the test one, so I could do to it whatever I wanted and it was not impacting the client.  ;-)

Yes, I did mean to say "unix version"....if it is not Linux or AIX, I just think it should be.  :-)

again thank you for your help,
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skullnobrainsCommented:
sorry i could not be helpful.

i really recommend the last course of action : adding an extra disk should be rather trivial for you now, and if you mount it as /usr or /var or wherever the application that is using up space stores it's data, you'll be able to produce something workable without too much hassle.

if you need any help working it out, feel free to post in this thread. if needed i may be able to grab some friends who know more about SCO than i do

best regards

btw, you do not have to accept answers that are not helpful to you. points are rather useless for me and cost you. accepting an answer implies that it will be kept in the database which is only meaningfull if you think the information in the thread will hep others. you are also allowed to accept your own answer when you want the question to be kept and you do not feel like accepting any of the provided answers.
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jgrammer42Author Commented:
skullnobrains,

Well, again, I truly do appreciate the help.  Even just having someone to bounce ideas off of is very helpful.  And I would like you to get credit for that.  

Yeah, I will try and set it up where I add a disk partition and then mount it under /usr  That is where the application is installed anyway.

Again, thank you.

Jeff
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