Correcting the Table of Authorities in Word

There are Cases that appear under the 'Rules' heading in the Table of Authorities in a word document. What is the best way to correct this so that the 'cases' appear in the Cases heading not in the Rules heading?

The idea is to transfer the item, using the easiest means possible, from where it is to where it belongs.
Pedrov664Asked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

aikimarkCommented:
please post an example document
0
Pedrov664Author Commented:
Aikimark,

I have posted a sampling of the Table of Authorities since the actual document is considered confidential at this point in time. Hope that helps. If you need further assistance please ask.

Please look at the bottom under Rules and you will see there are cases listed there. Obviously these should not be there.
Table-of-Authorities.docx
0
aikimarkCommented:
please post an example where there are valid Rules entries mixed in with cases in the Rules section.  The problem will be to correctly identify the misplaced entries as well as move them.
0
Get your problem seen by more experts

Be seen. Boost your question’s priority for more expert views and faster solutions

aikimarkCommented:
secondary to that would be to include examples of some of the TOA entries in the document.

It is ok to create a fake document for the purposes of illustrating the problem.
0
Pedrov664Author Commented:
What actually occured is that during the entry process the entries were incorrectly marked under the wrong heading and are thus listed under Rules instead of Cases. I see no way or reorienting them to where they should be. But give me  time if you need a actual sample.
0
Pedrov664Author Commented:
See attached sample
Table-of-Authorities.docx
0
aikimarkCommented:
I did my own test, moving items in a test document from all the standard classes to another.  In the example code below, I'm reclassifying a rule into a case for field seven in my document.  To cause the document to reflect the change, I'm updating all the fields.  This only needs to be done once at the end of the TOA item movement/reclassification.
Dim rng As Range
Set rng = Activedocument.Fields(7).Code
rng.Text = Replace(rng.Text, " \c 4 ", " \c 1 ")
Activedocument.Fields.Update

Open in new window


===========
The question for you is: How do you (and VBA code) determine which rule items should be reclassified as cases?
0
Pedrov664Author Commented:
All cases should have a name V name syntax to them. Rules start with FRCP or related jargon, etc. etc.

Let me see if I understand this right, all I have to do is find the offending code in the document and replace c4 with c1? And this will move the improperly classified rule item to the cases heading? Will this work vice versa?
0
aikimarkCommented:
Yes.  The class of the TOA field is denoted by the "\c #" number at the end of the string.

If you press Alt+Shift+I you will be able to walk through the entries and reclassify them from the dialog.  If there are a reasonably few number of items that need to be moved, then the dialog might be the best solution.

==========
Rules start with FRCP or related jargon
In your second example document, I see two Fed. R. Civ. P. entries. One is a Statutes class and one is a Rules class.

If you can enumerate a reasonably large list of patterns for Rules entries, then an automated process might be a decent way of reducing the number of misclassified items that need to be handled manually.

In your original document, we see the following Rule candidate patterns
Fed. R. Civ. P.
Federal Rule of Civil Procedure
Rule

But, you only need to reclassify four items, which should be an easy task with the dialog.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
Pedrov664Author Commented:
Ok, will attempt it.
0
Pedrov664Author Commented:
You make it sound so simple it makes me wonder why I could not figure it out. But, guess that is why you got all the points.
0
aikimarkCommented:
Maybe it is a perspective problem -- case of forest v. trees

Maybe it is a familiarity problem, where you have a particular solution in your mind, and need the view of someone that is looking at this fresh.  Honestly, this is the first time I've ever dealt with TOAs (granted, the feature was only introduced in 2003).

I think of myself as particularly lazy, so my solutions might entail the lesser effort to implement a manual solution versus code/test a VBA solution.  Even with a programmatic solution, it might only reduce the amount of manual work, not eliminate it completely.
0
Pedrov664Author Commented:
A humble opinion if I may say so mayself. You did, however, save the day!
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Microsoft Applications

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.