configuring a second router as a repeater

I have an existing wireless network, and I'd like to use a second router as a repeater, to extend the range. I see others have done this (http://www.experts-exchange.com/Networking/Wireless/Q_26934238.html) and I'm trying to create a configuration on the second router.

Here's the first router: LAN IP 192.168.0.1  subnet 255.255.252.0 using dhcp.

On the second router, I disable dhcp, (so it doesn't generate new ip addresses in the lan), but I keep it set to dhcp to get its own ip address from the first router. Unfortunately, it doesn't pick up a new address, which defaults to 192.168.1.1

I know that I need to match the ssid, and ensure a different channel (which I think it can select automatically) but I'm having trouble knowing what to set in terms of the ip address of the second router/repeater.

I tried 192.168.0.2. and 192.168.1.1 but this doesn't work. Should the second router be static (and if so, what would its settings be)? If anyone can specify the required settings for the second router to join the existing wireless network, and then extend it, that is all I need.

Also, what would be a tool to see the values that a roaming pc is using for the wireless access ip? I'd like to be able to see the ip address of the wireless router that it is using as I walk from one router to the repeater.
jeffleeseAsked:
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Boyd (HiTechCoach) Trimmell, Microsoft Access MVPDesigner and DeveloperCommented:
I would recommend the second device to be just a wireless access point not another router.  This is usually also cheaper. This will make things a lot simpler. Otherwise you will need to disable all the "router" stuff in the second device.

Give routers static ip addresses not in dhcp scope;
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jeffleeseAuthor Commented:
I accept the recommendation, but I am trying to use existing hardware, thus this question remains.
When you say "Give routers static ip addresses not in dhcp scope" I need more explanation to use this help. The first and main router will need to stay with DHCP, so do you mean set only the second (repeating) router to have a static address?

The first router creates dhcp addresses in the range 192.168.0.100 to 192.168.0.199 and has a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0. So what would the static ip settings be for the repeater?
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Darr247Commented:
Don't use the second unit as a router at all... connect it to the LAN using one of its LAN ports instead of the WAN/Internet port, and disable the router-turned-AP's DHCP server.
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jeffleeseAuthor Commented:
To Darr247, that would be fine if I wanted to use the cable, but I want to use the wireless.
So, the AP (what does that stand for?) joins  the real router over the wireless network yet also increases the wireless range.
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jeffleeseAuthor Commented:
Further to TheHighTechCoach, when you say "Give routers static ip addresses not in dhcp scope" do you mean I could give any ip address as its static address (outside dhcp scope).
So, any random ip like 123.1.2.3
and then same subnet and dns name servers?
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Boyd (HiTechCoach) Trimmell, Microsoft Access MVPDesigner and DeveloperCommented:
The second router does not really work as a repeater for the first wireless access fount in the first router. It is a second Access point.

You will need to connect/link the second router into the LAN with a wire. That means you will need a cable connected the second router that connects to the LAN either through a switch on the LAN or the first router.

Note: All the traffic for the devices connected to the second router will travel down the same wire to the LAN.  

The first router creates dhcp addresses in the range 192.168.0.100 to 192.168.0.199

This means that dynamic IPs handed out will be in the range 192.168.0.100-192.168.0.199

The ranges 192.168.0.1-192.168.0.99 and 192.180.0.200-192.168.0.255 are used for static IPs.

Your primary router (first one) is at IP 192.168.0.1.  I would set the second router at 192.168.0.2 with the same subnet 255.255.252.0.  You could use any IP that is not within the DCHP range of 192.168.0.100-192.168.0.199 and the same subnet 255.255.252.0.

I recommend that you have a plan for IP used.

I do something like this:

192.168.0.1/10 for routers and switches

192.168.0.11/20 for servers

192.168.0.21/30 for printers

192.168.0.51/99  for workstations/PCs
FWIW: -I prefer to use static IPs-  especially if the workstation is sharing any resources like folders and/or, printer(s)

192.168.0.100/199 for DHCP dynamically set IPs

Netwrrk diagram
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jeffleeseAuthor Commented:
Thanks that's really clear. My main error was in thinking I could repeat based off of the wireless lan of the first router. I think that is a capability of a real repeater. I wonder why a router can't do it?
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Boyd (HiTechCoach) Trimmell, Microsoft Access MVPDesigner and DeveloperCommented:
I wonder why a router can't do it?
Routers are for sharing a network connection. It is not design to extend the range of the antenna of another wireless Access Point (AP).

Might want to bing/google for: wireless access point antenna extension
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jeffleeseAuthor Commented:
I found a Linksys wireless range extender, as they are called it seems.
Thanks for the help.
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jeffleeseAuthor Commented:
Thanks for making the effort to fill in the details I needed. Graphic was brilliant.
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Darr247Commented:
So, you're going to connect it as I suggested in http:#a39444329.

Using a /22 mask with a 192.168.x.x IP range is going to give you technical problems if there are windows machines running XP or 2003 Server and older versions of windows (Vista SP1 too, but I suppose everyone's updated that to at least SP2).  But since this is closed I'll let you figure that out on your own.

I was unable to respond until now because we lost power during the storms last night and it was just now (finally) restored. My network was still fully functional on my UPS, but the tower from which I get my data link goes to low power mode when its generator is running and I can't even make a 1XRTT connection.
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Boyd (HiTechCoach) Trimmell, Microsoft Access MVPDesigner and DeveloperCommented:
You're welcome.

Humans really are visual creature. I find that Visio very handy for stuff like this..
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