Collapsing an AD Site. Questions

We have two AD Sites separted by a super fast (GB) link. Not sure why two separate Sites were created to beging with. The main subnet stretches across the two Sites so for all intent and purpose, its one big Site. There are no clients in this Site. Its strictly for DR but it does have a lot of servers. Only one DC and 3-4 subnet objects. We decided it should be just one Site. I am just going to move the server object to our corporate Site, delete the subnet objects and recreate them in the corporte Site and delte the Site link.

May sound like a silly question but we don't know what, it any dependencies there are on this Site. I can't imagine any. Sites are just to regulate replication and to assist clients for logins. Is there any logging or checking anywhere I can do to see if there are dependencies?
shadowtuckAsked:
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SreRajCommented:
Do you have Exchange in the site which you want to collapse?

You may not delete the subnet objects, you can remove it from Site2 and add it to Site1. You will have to move servers manually. You could restart AD Directory Service on the moved DC so that it re-creates DNS records appropriately, normally DNS Records will be updated automatically.
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Mike KlineCommented:
DFS is also site aware if you are using that but it seems like in your setup you should be good with that fast link.

When you say DR are you using that site as a lag site.  It is not supported but not uncommon more on lag sites  http://blogs.technet.com/b/askds/archive/2008/10/20/lag-site-or-hot-site-aka-delayed-replication-for-active-directory-disaster-recovery-support.aspx

Thanks

Mike
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shadowtuckAuthor Commented:
We have Exchange in that Site but Exchange belongs to our corporate Site, not the Site the server actually sits in. When we installed Exchange we purposely made all our Exchange servers part of the same Site which is corporate because we had plan to merge them into one Site. Other than Exchange, I can't think of anything else that would be Site dependent.

As for subnets, as I said, I will delete them from Site 1 and add them to Site 2. Delete/Remove, and finally the Site link. I think once I move the server to the new Site, right click and run the KCC, new connection objects should appear.
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Mike KlineCommented:
You should be fine then,   repadmin /kcc will also recalculate the topology instead of having to wait the default 15 minutes  http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc742173.aspx

Thanks

Mike
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shadowtuckAuthor Commented:
Thanks Mike. No, we are not implementing a lag Site. We have two Exchange servers and they are both being used to service users. Its an unorthodox setup but it works. Typically, with two Sites, I would have one Site with production servers and all the DB's replicate to a remote Site for DR. This server would just have copies.

Because we have a 10GB link between the Sites, I have two MB servers. One in each Site with a FSW in yet another Site so if either MB goes down, the other will pick up as long as the FSW is reachable. I call the other Site DR for lack of a better term. Maybe remote is better. This setup allows us automatic failover without the manual process that a typical DR setup would require adjusting quorum etc.....
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Mike KlineCommented:
Nice in the government world we call it  COOP (Continuity of Operations Planning)  site :)
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