Create Reverse PTR Record for Email Server

Hello,
I recently set up an email server in my house. When I send out emails it oftentimes gets caught as spam in others mailboxes. Sometimes it doesn't even reach them. Someone told me I need to have my ISP create the reverse ptr record for my mail server. When I spoke with my ISP, they said it was something that I do on my end.

Who is right? And if I need to do it on my end how exactly do I do it?

Thanks All! Happy Labor Day Weekend!

ES
eshiramAsked:
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Paul MacDonaldDirector, Information SystemsCommented:
A PTR record is created in DNS.  Who owns your DNS?
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Antonio VargasMicrosoft Senior Cloud ConsultantCommented:
You need to create a SFP. please use this site:

http://mxtoolbox.com/

enter your e-mail domain and do a blacklist check.

also to create an SPF record:

http://www.123-reg.co.uk/support/answers/Domains/Domain-Configuration/how-do-i-add-an-spf-record-to-my-domain-name-349/

to create a PTR record:

http://www.ipswitch.com/support/imail/guide/imailgsv8.1/Appendix%20A%20dns4.html

a PTR record is basically name to IP resolution and you need to do it on your public DNS.

I assume that you have access and control to your public DNS zone administration.

all the above records are created there
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Simon Butler (Sembee)ConsultantCommented:
PTR has nothing to do with your DNS.
It is something set by your ISP as it is set on the IP address.

However if the server is at home and you are on a home broadband connection it will be unlikely that you can get a PTR set. You usually have to be on a business connection.
In that case you will need to configure Exchange to send email out via a smart host, usually your ISPs SMTP Server.

Simon.
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Paul MacDonaldDirector, Information SystemsCommented:
"PTR has nothing to do with your DNS."
This is wrong, wrong, wrong.  Sorry ACE.
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Frank McCourryV.P. Holland Computers, Inc.Commented:
to get a PTR record, you must have a static IP address.  This is because a PTR record is a Reverse look up of your IP address.  If you have a static IP, then you will need to contact your ISP to have this record created.  Most ISP's will do this for a business account, but not for residential.

My recommendation is to use a smart host, most ISP's have a smart host you can send all of your mail through.  Typically you will need to ask a level 2 tech about this or find the information on their website.
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footechCommented:
Although I agree that a PTR is related to your DNS (it is a DNS record after all), very rarely is it ever created in the same place that your other DNS records (all your A records, MX, etc.) are created (I think this is what Sembee2 meant since I have no doubt he knows all the details surrounding PTR records).  It is almost exclusively created by the ISP who leases your IP to you, and there is usually no facility for you as the customer to create or manage your own PTR records.  You just have to call them up or email them and tell them what PTR record you need created for your IP.
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Antonio VargasMicrosoft Senior Cloud ConsultantCommented:
A PTR record is a DNS record. It's true that to have a PTR record you must have a static IP address, which can be the case as many providers can give static addresses to residential customers. If you don't have a static address the PTR creation is only one of the several problems you will have. so the bottom line is either you have a static address and you create the necessary DNS records to make it reliable and keep him off the blacklists, or you have a dynamic address and you need to use alternatives like smtp relays hosted by the ISPs
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Paul MacDonaldDirector, Information SystemsCommented:
"It's true that to have a PTR record you must have a static IP address...."
This isn't true, either.

Again, who owns your DNS?  You, or your ISP?
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Simon Butler (Sembee)ConsultantCommented:
@paulmacd you are wrong on so many levels.

If you have a dynamic DNS entry, how is the PTR going to stay active because your address changes frequently?

PTR has nothing to do with YOUR DNS - read what I wrote.
The PTR has to be set on the IP address, which is unconnected to your own DNS entries.
Two different zone records, controlled by two different groups. It might be that your ISP also looks after your domain name, but that doesn't mean they will set the PTR for you.

I could set my PTR to maila.microsoft.com if I wanted to, nothing Microsoft could do about it.

Simon.
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Paul MacDonaldDirector, Information SystemsCommented:
In a Windows network DHCP updates DNS, if the clients can't update it themselves.  It's true PTR records exist in the reverse lookup zone, but there's a one-to-one correlation to A records in the forward lookup zone, and they both exist in (my) DNS.

It's true anyone can add records (or whole domains for that matter) to DNS, regardless of whether or not they're legitimate.  It won't matter in most cases because - in your example - it's unlikely anyone outside of yourself is using your DNS to look up Microsoft hosts.
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Frank McCourryV.P. Holland Computers, Inc.Commented:
PTR records on the public internet can only be updated by the owner of the IP addresses.  If you ISP routes a block of IP addresses to you, then you would be considered the owner, even though you are really "Leasing" the addresses.

Basically, If you control the issuing of the IP address, then you would have the authority to managed the reverse lookup zone or PTR records.

If your ISP issues the address to you, then only they can change the reverse zone records.  It is a matter of authority.
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Paul MacDonaldDirector, Information SystemsCommented:
"PTR records on the public internet can only be updated by the owner of the IP addresses."
Thus the very first question:  Who owns your DNS?
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eshiramAuthor Commented:
My DNS is owned/hosted by my ISP.
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Paul MacDonaldDirector, Information SystemsCommented:
It's moot now, as you've indicated the problem is solved, but I presume you contacted them again and got things straight?
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eshiramAuthor Commented:
Yes, it is all good. Thank you everyone for your input! I greatly appreciate it!!

Enjoy the weekend.
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