Opening a NAS library in Windows 7

Hello all,

I feel like this might be the most ridiculous question ever.

Via email, I was given an internal NAS location to save some files, example: nas.internal.comp.data/loc

When I click on this link, the browser displays the folder (Apache server - port 80). But from the browser, I have no ability to write to the folder. If I enter this location in File Explorer, it just pops up the folder in the browser again.

What else have I tried:
- I searched for this server in the Networks section of File Explorer but the server name "nas.internal.comp.data" does not appear.
- I have tried replacing "http://" with "ftp://" in File Explorer - but port 80 isn't a FTP port.

What tool do I use in order to have write access to this NAS file location in Windows 7? The person who sent me this URL is travelling for several hours... so hopefully someone in the EE community can give me a clue.

BTW, there isn't any pw protection on this location so I will be able to write to it once I know what to do/where to go.

Thanks a million!
LVL 4
S ConnellyTechnical WriterAsked:
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Eric AKA NetminderCommented:
What tool do I use in order to have write access to this NAS file location in Windows 7?

It depends. I assume the file is on the server, and not local to your machine. That being the case, you will need to map the server as a local drive (I don't have a Win7 machine handy, but it's fairly straightforward using a wizard MS probably provides for you -- they did in XP). When you map the drive, you'll map it using the ftp protocol.

It will then look like any other drive on your computer, so you should be able to open a file using a text editor. I don't use Notepad; I use a free program called NoteTab (www.notetab.exe), which has a free version, because I can set it to automatically create backup files that increment every time it saves. There are others (do a search for "free text editor" and pick the one you like).

You'll also need to set up File Explorer to show you the entire name of the file (in other words, don't hide extensions).

The other way to accomplish your task would be to use a FTP program that includes an editor and again, shows you the entire name of the file. The one I use is WS-FTP and it's ancient (like... last century ancient) -- but it works very well. There are any number of them that do the same kind of thing, though; again, a search for "free ftp client" should give you any number of acceptable programs.

Hope this helps.

ep
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MikeIT ProfessionalCommented:
If its an Internal Network Storage drive, just click on Network in "My Computer" and look for the drive that way.  Then navigate to the folder that you have access to.
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Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVEDeveloperCommented:
What happens in File Explorer if you change the forward slash to a backslash, i.e.:

nas.internal.comp.data\loc

It should really have a server name, as in:

\\ComputerName\nas.internal.comp.data\loc

In any case, I suggest expanding the "Network" entry in File Explorer and eyeball the shares that it shows...you'll probably see the one you're looking for. Regards, Joe
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S ConnellyTechnical WriterAuthor Commented:
Hello, thank you for all the replies...
I'm on mobile for the moment so... Just quickly, I need to be clear... I cannot see this file location by navigating Networks in File Explorer; in fact, that was my first assumption.

Joe, I don't understand what you mean by server name, that is its name. Basically, server name/directory. But I'll try flipping the slash.  

If it helps, I think the person who sent me this link assumed I was using a Linux box (as with 99% of my coworkers). For them, that link brings up a file folder where they can easily copy/del files and directories.

I'll read the rest when I get back to my office.
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S ConnellyTechnical WriterAuthor Commented:
Clarification - under networks (in file explorer) I see lots of personal computers but I cannot see this NAS. Again, obvious I do have access to it because I can clearing see it within my Internet Browser. Remember, this is a local NAS on a private net.
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Eric AKA NetminderCommented:
I do have access to it because I can clearing see it within my Internet Browser.

Maybe, maybe not, depending on the policies implemented by your network administrator. You could see the other computers, but not have access to them. Linux is written such that the permission to do anything on or with a machine is protected by the machine; Windows is based on the user.

But I think joewinograd is on the right track. There should be something that designates that physical server, and it would always start (for mapping purposes) with a \\ ...
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Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVEDeveloperCommented:
> Joe, I don't understand what you mean by server name, that is its name. Basically, server name/directory.

A network share in Windows has syntax like:

\\ComputerName\ShareName\volume

If you know what that is, you can map it to a drive letter with the [net use] command:

net use X: \\ComputerName\ShareName\volume

I'm leaving my office now for a few hours. Will check back into this thread when I return, but I'm sure you'll have it sorted by then. Regards, Joe
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S ConnellyTechnical WriterAuthor Commented:
Thanks for everyone's help... but it really was simple. LOL

It really was as simple as pasting the URL, "\\nas.internal.comp.data" into File Explorer

Instead of...

"\\nas.internal.comp.data/loc" - this automatically opened the browser.

Reason (and this is rather odd behavior):
\\nas.internal.comp.data/loc - is only valid in the browser
but
\\nas.internal.comp.data/locate - "locate" is the full name of the directory, as visible in Windows File Explorer. Typing that path into File Explorer actually works.

Unsure why the name is different and why one opens only in the browser and the other only in File Explorer... but they are both the exact same location.

Also unsure why I could not see (or search for) the NAS server "nas.internal.comp.data" but once I connected to it (by getting the URL correct), it now appears under the Network hierarchy.

I don't think anyone had the correct answer but if I did miss the correct answer from one of you, please let me know and I'll credit you. :-)

Thanks again all.
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Eric AKA NetminderCommented:
Unsure why the name is different and why one opens only in the browser and the other only in File Explorer

Short Answer: Microsoft.

Longer Answer: Natively, Microsoft doesn't show you information after the period, because in its infinite wisdom, it doesn't think you need to know that a file is a .doc or a .xls or a .locate file because it -- Microsoft -- has figured out all of that for you, and has even figured out what program should be used to open it.

unsure why I could not see (or search for) the NAS server "nas.internal.comp.data" but once I connected to it (by getting the URL correct)

Because you were telling Windows to find a file -- not a server and drive.

did miss the correct answer from one of you, please let me know

Essentially, all of us did. Whether it's called that by a specific process you used, you did map the network drive (as I suggested). You did navigate to the right folder (as FireRunt suggested). You did change the path to include the double backslash (as joewinogard suggested). None of those may be the specific, word-for-word answer, but the fact is that we all said the same thing in different ways AND it's exactly what was necessary for you to accomplish your task.

ep
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S ConnellyTechnical WriterAuthor Commented:
Hello Eric,

Sorry for the delayed response.

>Because you were telling Windows to find a file -- not a server and drive.

I thought I explained this. "nas.internal.comp.data" is the server name and "/loc" is the path. Nowhere in my EE posts did I mention a file name. I am unsure why the server name and path are being mistaken for anything other than what they are.

At any rate, the server "nas.internal.comp.data" doesn't appear under File Explorer - Network, until it is entered (in Explorer's address bar) as ""\\nas.xxx.somecompany.io". Only after doing that will it appear in the Network list. This must be a Windows 7 File Explorer quirk. On my Ubuntu workstation, this server appears without effort (and is searchable).

No matter, right clicking on the path, "/loc" and mapping it... makes all this moot.

Incidentally, even after mapping the path "/loc", I still cannot see any of the other paths available from this server under Network. If I want to see them, I must enter ""\\nas.xxx.somecompany.io" in File Explorer's address bar every time File Explorer is restarted.

>Essentially, all of us did.

I have no problem awarding each of you for your effort. I am really grateful that each of you took time out of your day to help a stranger and without any real benefit to you. Which reminds me... I really need to pay it forward... I've been too lazy lately. :-)

I completely understand that that sometimes it is difficult to decipher a technical problem... looking back, I realize that I had asked the wrong questions. It certainly wasn't about needing a special tool... rather it was simply formatting that was wrong.
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S ConnellyTechnical WriterAuthor Commented:
Note: This is simply a summary of some of the answers given and my assessment (in no way is it my intention to dismiss your responses). I am trying to determine how to award points. Again, I understand the difficulties of answering a question where you must make a lot of assumptions. The effort is what I am awarding on... it is absolutely appreciated!

FireRunt Posted on 2013-08-30 at 12:12:42: Incorrect because my initial EE post already mentioned that the server name doesn't appear under Network.

joewinograd Posted on 2013-08-30 at 12:16:26: The closest correct answer. The key was adding the "\\" but for some reason, Joe, erroneously assumed that "nas.internal.comp.data" wasn't the server name. Also, incorrectly suggested that I should already see the server name under Networks.

ericpete Posted on 2013-08-30 at 12:41:38: Incorrectly suggested policies prevented me from having proper access. Repeated Joe's suggestion.

joewinograd Posted on 2013-08-30 at 12:58:51: Correctly suggested using Net use for mapping.

Thanks
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Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVEDeveloperCommented:
sconnell,
Thanks for taking the time to explain your reasoning – very helpful! I'm glad you got it sorted. And, of course, thanks for awarding the points. Regards, Joe
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S ConnellyTechnical WriterAuthor Commented:
Hello SouthMod,

I didn't request that the question get reopened. I requested a small edit to one of my posts. I do not have the ability to make that edit.

Please read my request for attention.

Thank you.
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