Find out why computer shutdown

Hi,

Think my circuit where my computer is might be overloaded, is there any way to see in a log why it shutdown, even if it isn't due to an over load?

Thanks!
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Computer GuyAsked:
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bbaoIT ConsultantCommented:
first check System Events of Windows logs. Right-click My Computer and choose Manage to enter Computer Management console, then check System under Computer Management -> System Tools -> Event Viewer -> Windows Logs in the left pane.
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R. Andrew KoffronCommented:
if the power is failing not really, it doesn't create logs without power.
you could get a small UPS and setup the software so you'd see alerts of the UPS taking over.
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alicainCommented:
Hello!

Some high end power supplies come with software that will let you monitor the input and various outputs of the PSU.

But there is not anything built into Windows 7 that would help with this, the best you would see is an "Unexpected Shutdown" event in the System Event Log.  But the cause of that could be hardware or even some rare software issues.

The PC's BIOS event log may also give a power off type message, so worth looking there too.

You could look into acquiring for a hardware power meter.

Regards,
Alastair.
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Gerwin Jansen, EE MVETopic Advisor Commented:
>>  circuit
Did a circuit breaker trip then? Can you try a different circuit?

If you are looking at the windows event log and you find an event 6008 (the previous shutdown was unexpected) then your computer either lost power or switched itself off due to some thermal problem.

If you can, open the computer and look for the CPU heat sink, it may have become loose or cluttered with dust.
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Computer GuyAuthor Commented:
How can I tell if it is too hot
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BillDLCommented:
One way to tell whether the shutdown is being caused by power loss is to boot into the CMOS Setup (BIOS) and look for a setting named something like "On AC Power Loss" with options to "Restart" or "Stay Off".  You said that the computer shut down, so change the setting to "Reboot" and observe whether it does this the next time rather than shutting down.

Some motherboard manufacturers have monitoring utilities where you can see whether all the fans are spinning properly, what temperature the various motherboard thermal sensors are reading, and with some you can also adjust the thresholds for warnings to be issued.  For example, Microstar International (MSi) had a utility named "PC Alert 4" for many of its older motherboards, Intel had one named "Intel Active Monitor", etc.  It is possible that they have been superseded or ditched though.  I found a free utility and a trial one that look to be fairly universal, but I didn't read too much into either of them:
http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/hwmonitor.html
http://www.hmonitor.com/

I looked at WMIC-VBS methods of getting CPU temperatures, but apparently they are totally unreliable and should not be used.
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McKnifeCommented:
Hi.
"event 6008 (the previous shutdown was unexpected) then your computer either lost power or switched itself off due to some thermal problem."  - incorrect. It will be caused by bluescreens, too and also by users switching the power supply.
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Gerwin Jansen, EE MVETopic Advisor Commented:
@McKnife "lost power" = "switching the power supply" :) I'm thinking that is not the case with this question ;)
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Computer GuyAuthor Commented:
Was cluttered with dust.
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