active/active file share cluster with Windows server 2012?

I have two identical windows 2012 physical servers with 16TB each via DAS drives. Is it possible to setup an active/active file server cluster with my two machines?

Thanks
WangstaaAsked:
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Possibly, if both your servers are connected to the DAS drive?

1. Add Failover Clustering Role to both nodes.
2. Run the Failover Cluster verification wizard.
3. Create a Failover Cluster.
4. Add Storage as a Disk Resource.
5. Add the Disk Resource as a Clustered Shared Volume

this will then be available to both hosts concurrently.
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WangstaaAuthor Commented:
Both servers are connected to the same DAS drive, however DAS drive is running in split mode so the storage is independent of each other.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Both servers need to be mounted to save storage path.
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WangstaaAuthor Commented:
I am sorry can you elaborate on that?
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Reconfigure your DAS so its not split.
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WangstaaAuthor Commented:
it's not capable of connecting to two physical servers if it is not in split mode.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Both servers have to access shared storage.

The DAS is not in shared storage mode unless you can change so each server can detect both sets of storage

Also the DAS has to support scsi3 persistent reservations

Run the fail over cluster wizard it will verify if you can build a cluster by checking conditions
 Its likelybto fail unless you have shared storage
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WangstaaAuthor Commented:
Can I do it with NAS drives?
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
NAS are already providing shares.

Active Active is provided by servers connected to shared storage

Eg DAS or iSCSI or FC
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andyalderCommented:
I can't see how a failover cluster is active/active. It's true that both servers can access the volume with CSV but aren't they limited to "sharing" it in such situations where Hyper-V VMs are on it which are fixed size and don't move about on the disk so they can't overwrite each other? Admittedly you can modify the size of VMs but it's the CSV owner which does that and there's only one of them.

Normal active/active filesharing is setup using DFS replication rather than clustering.
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markvl1Sr Systems EngineerCommented:
The way I understand Active/Active Microsoft clustering, it is more or less active/passive with multiple nodes sharing multiple resources. i.e. (NodeA hosting DiskX and NodeB, hosting disk Y , and NodeC hosting DiskZ etc.) N-1 nodes can still handle all of the disks so if one node fails the others can grab the resource and continue on.  The disks are all shared like with a san.  All nodes are active but only one node at a time has any given resource.
 
Hyper-v active clusters are an exception to this design where all nodes see all disks, though only one host node will access any given vm's disk resources at a time, and makes the Hyper-v scenario's effective results similar to the example above.
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