2nd hard drive has "system" included in list of attributes in Disk Manager Win 7 Pro

I have a Windows 7 Pro computer with 3 hard drives:
- one is Vista
- one is D: that has data on it but maybe not important
- one is C: with Windows 7 Pro

When I go to image the Windows 7 Pro, it does not give me the option of imaging onto the D: drive at all.
The D: drive in Disk Manager shows, in addition to other things: "System" as does C:.

How can I tell if the Windows 7 Pro system is really using D: at all?
How can I free up D: to use for the image backup?
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Fred MarshallPrincipalAsked:
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Seth SimmonsConnect With a Mentor Sr. Systems AdministratorCommented:
first drive is vista...
do you have dual boot?  that could be why if boot manager was installed there
How much free space on D: ?
When you open Windows Explorer on D: What tree structure do you see?  When you right click on the Users Folder (if there is one) and click Properties, what is the size of the folder?
Fred MarshallPrincipalAuthor Commented:
D probably doesn't have enough space to image C if D is left alone.  So be it *I think*.
My concern is that D contains something critical to Win 7 (which is booting from C).

When I look at D, it has various files that don't look too important to me.
For example there is a Users\fred with old files I used to care about and no longer maintain.  

This computer was first used by me as a Vista machine.
I kept Vista around as a reference machine if/when needed.
Then it was used by me as a Win 7 machine.  I expect that's where the files on D came from but I don't recall how they got there vs. using C for the new user.
Now it's been passed on and is in use as a Win 7 machine (C).

What I want to know is: Does Win 7 consider any of the files on D important?  (not the data files but any others..)  How is one to know?  Why is the "system" attribute showing?  Why isn't D available for C image?

I would like to image C and D would be a convenient target.
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jcimarronConnect With a Mentor Commented:
When I look at D, it has various files that don't look too important to me."
Unless you show us what those what those files look like, it is hard for us to offer an opinion.

"Does Win 7 consider any of the files on D important?"
Make a backup of D: and then format D:.  Reboot.  If you have problems you can restore from the back up.
BillDLConnect With a Mentor Commented:
>>> The D: drive in Disk Manager shows, in addition to other things: "System" as does C: <<<
>>> Why is the "system" attribute showing? <<<

I assume you are referring to the (System) that shows immediately after the "Healthy" status in Disk manager rather than the Volume Label which would could show as "SYSTEM (C:)" and "SYSTEM (D:)" if both have been given the same volume label at some time.  I temporarily changed the Volume Label of my D: Drive from "DATA" to "SYSTEM" to illustrate.
Only C: has (System) showing under "status" though.Given the same circumstances what I would probably do is turn off System Restore on the D: Drive, delete the Catalogue for the D: Drive under "Indexing Services", create a new single folder on the drive, make sure that you are viewing hidden/system files and "protected OS system files", and move every file and folder on the drive into the new folder.  That should give you a reasonable indication whather the data on the drive is needed, but you should bear in mind that on occasions some temporary setup and log files can be created on other hard drives, and without them it is possible that you might not be able to uninstall the odd software, update, or patch and would not be aware of this until it happened.

A utility program like CCleaner might be able to determine if the target for some registry entries point to files that have been moved into the new folder.

You could do a search in the registry of all values and value data containing "D:\" (untick "match whole string only") and evaluate whether the findings are just Most Recently Used (MRU) ones or are more important.  There are free utilities that help you to search the registry and present all found instances in a window or a text file.
Fred MarshallConnect With a Mentor PrincipalAuthor Commented:
I figured it out.  The Vista drive is where all the boot files are located.
Fred MarshallPrincipalAuthor Commented:
Thanks all for the insights!
Thank you fmarshall.  Glad you got to the root of the problem.
fmarshall--thanks for telling us the solution.
Fred MarshallPrincipalAuthor Commented:
Well, seth2740 suggested the answer really.
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