Extend wireless in my house with hard wired AP

In my house I have ATT U-verse with a 2Wire 3800HGV-B

Ideally I'd like to use a different wireless router in place of my 2Wire but after a lot of research and failed attempts I'm not going to ask at this time.

I have CAT5e run to every room in the house.  These lead back to a gigabit switch which is plugged into the 2Wire.

There are a few dead spots in one end of the house.  I purchased a Linksys RE1000 Wireless-N Range Extender but it grabs your wireless signal, the poor signal that it is, and does a poor job overall.

I returned the RE1000 because I'm looking for an AP that I can plug into one of the CAT5e jacks in a bedroom where the signal is low.  In a perfect world I'd like to maintain the same SSID/encryption as the 2Wire.  Can that be done or do I need a secondary SSID?  What device has the capability I'm looking for?

Thanks!
AxISQSAsked:
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Kash2nd Line EngineerCommented:
Apple Airport Extreme's do a really good job and they extend range quite well.


>>>> http://www.apple.com/uk/airport-extreme/
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AxISQSAuthor Commented:
Are there configurable options to use as a repeater in the manner I'm looking for?  Can I maintain the same SSID?
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jhyieslaCommented:
I have a similar scenario in our office building. I have Cat5 everywhere, but the building is too big for wireless from one router to cover it all.  Here's what I did and it seems to work well. I use Apple Airport Extremes because they are so solid, but you should be able to use anything you want.

I plugged AP1 at one end of the building into our Ethernet infrastructure. I gave it an SSID, a Static IP, and forced it to use a specific radio channel.  I plugged AP2 at the other end of the building. I gave it the same SSID, it's own unique static IP and forced it to use a different radio channel. Now anyone anywhere in the building can get a wireless connection to our LAN.  You should be able to do the same thing in your home.
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Thomas GrassiSystems AdministratorCommented:
We use Buffalo WiFi Routers and they work great.

You can use same ssid and key.

If you have wired to the rooms you can put a switch in one of the rooms and add the Buffalo to the Lan,

Just make sure you disable DHCP or make sure you have a different range of ip addresses to give out. Best to disable DHCP on the second wifi router.
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Darr247Commented:
Nearly any wireless router will do what you want. Just connect it to your network by one of its LAN ports instead of the WAN/Internet port, disable its DHCP server, and give its LAN interface an IP address outside the range of the 2wire's DHCP scope. Note the new wireless router's LAN IP address is only for accessing its setup menus, not for any type of routing... it will essentially be a wireless switch (or a hub, really, since all devices connected wirelessly will be sharing the bandwidth).
You can use the same or a different SSID as the 2wire, but choose a different channel. I suggest using channels 1 and 11... channel 6 is the default used by most manufacturers.
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sanjayrajtCommented:
Hi,

whatever you are going to use mainly consider external antenna ,a/b/g/n support.if your wireless AP giving signal strength 24Dbm or more will give you wide coverage.use dual band access points.
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AxISQSAuthor Commented:
sounds like i can take a spare router laying around and plug it in the the cat5 jack in the bedroom.  i'm going to take Darr247's suggestions and give it a shot.  i'll report back soon.

i would like to checkout the airport extreme but it's pricey!
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jhyieslaCommented:
You're right that you probably do it with any router.  You're also right that the AP's are not cheap, but they are incredibly rock solid. In our office we had some $300 high end AP's that kept messing up. I replaced them with the two APE's and we've just not had any issues; this was probably at least three years ago.

In my home I do not have cabling throughout the house so I have a mesh network of APE's extending the primary node's WLAN across the house so I can connect anywhere.
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Darr247Commented:
The Buffalo WZR-HP-G450H unit has RP-SMA connectors if you want to add something like an L-Com RE09P-RSP patch antenna to the interior of an outside wall (i.e. aimed 'in')... that should give a little better penetration through walls than even a high-gain omni/rubber-duck antenna does.  You could have a couple of those and one omni, or one of those and two omni, or three of those for maximum long range diversity.
L-Com RE09P-RSP Panel Antenna Specs (click for larger)L-Com also sells that same antenna with a Reverse Polarity-TNC plug, too...  that's the connector most Cisco/Linksys routers with removable antennae use.
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Thomas GrassiSystems AdministratorCommented:
Have you had any luck with this?
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AxISQSAuthor Commented:
Hi I failed following darr247's suggestion.   Maybe my router isn't advanced enough because I couldn't grab a gateway address, or assign one.  I might flash dd-wrt on a router I have laying around.  That might give me the advanced config needed.
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Darr247Commented:
> Hi I failed following darr247's suggestion.
When you connect the 'dead spot' router by one of its LAN ports, then plug a computer into another one of its LAN ports, does that computer get an IP address and Gateway IP, and be able to surf the 'net?

If not, then I would suspect something wrong with the cabling or terminations between that point and the ATT-supplied router.

To be clear, the router being used as an Access Point will not get an address from DHCP.  You manually assign its LAN interface an IP address outside the scope of the 2-wire's DHCP server, and it doesn't need a Gateway IP because it's not doing any routing, per se.
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Thomas GrassiSystems AdministratorCommented:
I think it is time to just go back and start over.

I would again suggest two Buffalo WiFi routers not expensive less than $100 for both check on NewEgg site.

They will work and take you about 30 min or less to setup both.

If you get them your problem will be solved

I can send you screen prints of my configs if needed

More info on buffalo if needed
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AxISQSAuthor Commented:
Going to grab some buffalo routers
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