How to Use DropBox on a Shared / Network / Mapped Drive

Hey All -

The company I work for has a fairly strict internet blockage policy mostly due to them being so large.  It's also not possible for exclusions to be made per user for some reason.  I have two connections at my desk - the corporate LAN and a network plugged into an external cable modem.  Instead of using two computers for when I need to get onto blocked services, I installed a 2nd NIC after receiving permission, and created a VM in VMWare Workstation assigned to the NIC.  I of course have it's IPv4/6 disabled on the host to prevent cross communication.

One service I depend on is Dropbox which is blocked on the corporate LAN.  It's where I organize all of my documentation and tools.  I've been using it in my VM, but have tried everything I can think of to make it syncronize to a folder shared with my workstation and the VM.  Unfortunatly, nothing has worked.  

Here's what I've tried & result:
- Installing Dropbox to Drive mapped to host folder - Dropbox will not allow

- Creating a symlink / directory junction to a host folder - didn't work

- Creating a temp drive in VMWare with drive letter X:, assigning it to Dropbox, letting it sync, exit Dropbox, remove temp drive and map host folder to X:, start Dropbox - This started working, but after a few seconds Dropbox had red X saying it didn't have rights to access it
 
Things that won't work or I don't have resources to do:
- If I had enough space I'd just use a sync app to sync th dropbox between a local vm folder and host folder, but my Dropbox is 80gb.

- Map drive on host to VM folder - I can't do this because they are on two completely different networks & subnets.  

I know that in a VM you can use a default DNS entry of "\\vmware-host" to refer to the host workstation.  Is there any such thing going to opposite direction?

Here are the specs I have to work with:
- Host OS - Windows 7 x64
- VM OS - Windows 7 x64
- Software - VMWare Workstation 10 (just upgraded)

Any Ideas?  I'm out of them -   Thanks!
BzowKAsked:
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Here's an idea, you could use CloudHQ, and Sync to another Cloud Provider, and then CloudHQ gives you access to your Dropbox files via a Web Browser?

Are you allowed the use of a Web browser?

http://andysworld.org.uk/2013/09/12/cloudhq-backup-and-sync-data-between-cloud-storage-providers/

What you are referring to is VMware Shared Folders, i.e. shared folders from the host appear in the VM. This is just a special internal windows shared folder.

the other way round is called Windows File Sharing.
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BzowKAuthor Commented:
Hmm -

Thank you for the suggestion, but I frequently access many of the files and even though it may be somewhat helpful, I'm looking for a folder-based solution.  Thanks for the tip, though.

Anybody else have any thoughts?  Thanks!
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Map a network drive from the HOST to the VM.

Sync Dropbox to a local drive in the VM, and Share it.
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BzowKAuthor Commented:
Thanks, but not possible.  Like I said, they are on different networks and cannot talk to each other on purpose.  Thanks, though...
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Not even, if you create a private IP Address range.

e.g. 192.168.1.1 for both Host and VM?
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BzowKAuthor Commented:
OK - I think I know what you are getting at...

I can add a second virtual NIC to the VM with the subnet of 192.168.1.1 - but - how would I do so host-side?  Also, the last thing I want to do is compromise security so need to make sure that traffic between the two networks does not mix.

Thanks
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
if you are using different IP Addresses, your TCP/IP traffic will only be between Host and VM.

Add another IP Address to your NIC on Host.
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