Image Sizes for Big Screen Display

I am putting together slide shows for projection on a big screen at a local senior center, and I'm trying to figure out if there are standards for how big a file should be to show well (or at least adequately) on a large projection screen.   Most of my files are JPG images, but they range all the way from 100 KB to 40 MB.  Are there some standards that can help me determine which are definitely OK, which are definitely not OK, and which could go either way?

Thanks,

Phil
philsimmonsAsked:
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KimputerCommented:
If you have a reasonable computer running this slideshow, just add whatever you want. If you want more efficiency (maybe you fear a slow computer, or not enogh storage), then resize pictures to the maxixum resolution of the screen projector (my guess somewhere from 1024x768 up to the 1920x1080, depending how new and expensive the screen is).
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philsimmonsAuthor Commented:
If I resize the image does the computer automatically "fill in" the new pixels, or do the number of pixels stay the same - just spread out over a larger image?  In other words, will resizing the image lower the resolution?

Thanks,

Phil
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KimputerCommented:
Resizing from lower to higher resolution depends on the method used. Most commonly, it will spread out and soften it a bit. It will always be noticable, as you may not need a too big of an imagination to know the computer cannot magically fill in data it knows nothing about.
There are quite a few free image batch converters out there, but these are most useful if you know about your files (also mostly useful for resizing down, not up), for instance, all taken with the same camera. If you have multiple different sources and resolutions, the aspect ratio might not be correct if you tell the program to resize them all to one resolution. On the other hand, other programs do it in percentage, but then you still don't really know what you end up with. Better get a few things sorted, and run the conversion a few times, with those files you have information about (be it, sorting by name, as some cameras have fixed prefixes, or sorting by resolution).
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philsimmonsAuthor Commented:
Thank you.
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