Live migration for guests between on windows 2012, windows 8 and windows 2008R2

I just finished live migration of hyper-v guest on Windows 2012, I like much, so I like to migrate more of other virtual machines and physical machines to it. Before I do that, I may have to set up a backup Hyper-v server so that in case of something happens, i like to move guests to the backup server.

How do you guys plan to setup a backup Hyper-v host machine? What is your strategy?

I have a unused Windows 2008 R2 license. If I install it on the new server, is it possible to upgrade to the same version of Hyper-v running on Windows 2012 and use as backup Hyper-v host machine so that I can do live migration between the two servers? How do I upgrade Hyper-v on Windows 2008 to resolve this possible compatibility issue. Do I add Hyper-v role in Windows 2008 first, then upgrade or install stand-alone Hyper-v Server 2012 on it?

Also, how about using Windows 8 with Hyper-V? Can I do live migration between Windows 8 and Windows 2012 for guests installed?
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crcsupportAsked:
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Install another Hyper-v server 2012 for replica

Or use Veeam Backup and Replication
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
You cannot use Windows 8 or your 2008 licenses for live migration. You'd need another 2012 license or you'd have to download and install the free "hyper-v server" edition for 2012 and cope with its severe management limitations. Those are your two options.

Licensing becomes a significant consideration when live migrating guest OSes. Licenses are assigned to servers, not to VMs. Moving a VM to another server may very well break licensing and you could find yourself in an illegal state. You must plan very carefully before implementing such a solution. If you aren't comfortable with Microsoft licensing, I'd work with a licensing specialist and even call MS Licensing department and get official documentation that what you are doing is covered under the number of licenses you have.

Live Migration is an awesome and powerful tool, but must be used with great care, especially in smaller environments where only a few licenses may be in play.

-Cliff
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crcsupportAuthor Commented:
Do you mean the OS license of the virtual guest is assigned to host server? Why moving VM to another machine will break licensing?
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
Yes, the license that allows a VM to run OS is assigned  to the host server. So moving a VM could put you on a position where the VM no longer has a license, thud breaking licensing.
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crcsupportAuthor Commented:
It  seems like licensing for live migration affects only workgroup environment, though I need to look into it more..
http://baudlabs.com/hyper-v-server-2012-live-migration-feature-is-not-free/
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crcsupportAuthor Commented:
"The point I was making about licensing is that you said you wanted to "bring it to client".  If the method of bringing it to the client is to simply run it for demonstration purposes on your Windows 8 laptop and you have a license for Windows Server 2012 SE assigned to your laptop, then you are okay.  But if the idea is to take the VM and run it on the client's hardware, the client would need to have a license for it and you would have to have a contract with Microsoft allowing you to distribute their software.  Microsoft licenses are paper transactions that are assigned to physical hardware and are transferrable between physical hosts only once every 90 days.
And, no live migration between client and server.  Live Migration is a server function.  But, again, according to your description, there is no need for a live migration.  Are you going to leave your laptop on during the trip to the customer so that clients can continue to access it while you are driving there?"

I think you misunderstood that I am trying to move VOSE license (2 for Windows Server 2012). I'm on the stage of converting already existing virtual machines with licensed OS such as Windows 2003 old servers. The OS licenses in the VMs are independently purchased volume licenses.
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
There is no such thug as  a VOSE license and server licenses are NEVER "in a VM" no matter how they were purchased. A license is ALWAYS assigned to a physical server and some newer licenses grant  the right to multiple VMs on which the physical server license is assigned. Moving a VM *never* moves a license. Even in a love migration scenario.
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crcsupportAuthor Commented:
Since I'm confused, I'm going to write what setup I have and what I understand for licensing. And please tell me if it's not correct.

I have 1 Windows 2012 server, two CPUs, volume license, standard.  it's running 2 virtual machines, one  was converted from old physical server, windows 2003 standard, volume license, and one new installation of Windows 2012.
So, am I compliant to Windows 2012 server licensing, 1 Windows Server 2012 standard license covers up to 2 CPUs and 2 VMs?

And then, I have another box runs Windows 2008 standard, no virtual machines in it. Since it covers up to 1 VM, maybe I install Hyper-v Server 2012 and can do live migration for only one VM from the Windows 2012 host to be compliant with licensing??
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
You could move a VM running 2008 or older. You would not be able to move a VM running anything newer than 2008 because your 2008 license does not grant rights to newer OS versions on that server.
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crcsupportAuthor Commented:
It's something I haven't thought about... I call Microsoft and find out. It's really pain to figure what they want for licensing.
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