Network IP problem

For 7 years, my Windows 2003 server has crashed multiple time requiring a reboot and hours of IT time. Almost always, it is an IP address error. Over 5 IT companies have had a crack at it, and none have resolved my issues. IT companies in our area open and close frequently, and none have been very helpful.  Last week, when the system crashed and the IP address error surfaced once again, it took 5 hours to fix, as usual.  The IT tech though, asked me afterwards if I knew why the cable modem input  first  went to the wireless router which then sent the information to the server which then communicated with all of the 15 hardwired computers. This would certainly explain why the wireless laptops could access the internet at times when the wired computers could not during the recurrent IP conflicts. He surmised that the wireless router was assigning IP addresses to the server which was creating the problem.

If the above makes any sense, would anyone know why my network was set up this way?  Are there any reliable online companies that can remote to me and work to address my continuing IP conflicts?
donsleepAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
if I knew why the cable modem input  first  went to the wireless router

In a server environment, this would not be a good idea, and probably the person who set it up this way left 2 (or more) DHCP servers in play.

The modem should go to a VPN router and that router should then hand out a static internal IP address to the server.

If the above makes any sense, would anyone know why my network was set up this way?

I am sure we don't know. One could surmise the person was trying to create wireless guest access.

If you want wireless access inside (just like wired access), hook up the wireless router LAN port to LAN port on your network, give it a static IP on your network and turn DHCP OFF on the wireless router.

If you want to provide wireless guest access inside your premises, introduce a commercial switch between the VPN router and the server that is capable of running VLAN's. Put wireless access on a VLAN that does not connect to your network.

Are there any reliable online companies that can remote to me

Better to get a reliable local company. They can access via Logmein or comparable product to assist you.

.... Thinkpads_User
0
Emmanuel AdebayoGlobal Windows Infrastructure Engineer - ConsultantCommented:
From the information provided, your wireless router was configured as DHCP and probably you have another DHCP running on your server. I wonder why  your engineer that came to check this for you did not notice this.

You will need to turn one of the DHCP off (either on the server or on the VPN), but I would turn off the dhcp on the wireless router.

One question, are you laptops login into the domain controller for authentication?
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Windows Networking

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.