Dell PowerEdge 2800 Ram / SSD Upgrade

We have a Dell PowerEdge 2800 server running Windows Server 2003 R2.  We are upgrading software packages and it requires MS SQL Express to be installed.  I purchased additional RAM for the system:

DDR2 667MHz (PC2-5300) CL5 Unbuffered UDIMM 240-Pin Desktop Memory Modules

which is what Crutial indicated was correct.  Over the weekend I installed it and was not able to get Windows nor Bios to recognize it.  I even tried the NVRAM jumper reset which not only did not work but also left the system un-bootable until I figured out the RAID controller had been turned off.

Second part of my question is the system does not seem to have any SATA connections and I'd like to add a SATA SSD to install the SQL Express on.  Suggestions on SATA cards that will work well with this server?  Thanks
no_usernameAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

CompProbSolvCommented:
That computer requires ECC RAM, which is typically used in servers.  Desktop RAM typically does NOT use ECC.

The Crucial specs on this do show that it requires ECC:
http://www.crucial.com/store/listparts.aspx?model=PowerEdge%202800&Cat=RAM
0
PowerEdgeTechIT ConsultantCommented:
The PowerEdge 2800 requires Registered ECC memory, PC2-3200 is recommended (faster may not work).  You can use 4x4GB for a total of 16GB or 6x2GB for a total of 12GB.

ftp://ftp.dell.com/Manuals/all-products/esuprt_ser_stor_net/esuprt_poweredge/poweredge-2800_User%27s%20Guide13_en-us.pdf

Note that Crucial lists Registered ECC is required as well (but has tested and validated 5300 speeds):
http://www.crucial.com/store/listparts.aspx?model=PowerEdge%202800&Cat=RAM

The PE 2800 also supports ONLY SCSI.  No SAS and no SATA.
0
DavidPresidentCommented:
Get yourself a PCI-e based SATA card and some duct tape to find a place to put the SSD internally ... or a PCI-e based eSATA controller so you can use an external eSATA cable and enclosure.    The SSDs won't care about vibration so you have some flexibility on mounting.

There are lots of choices for SATA cards.  Just find one that is NON-RAID and has support for Win2003.  You should go with SATA-III if your SSD has faster than around 250MB/sec throughput.

I would buy one at the local PC store so you could take it back if there is an incompatibility problem as the cards are so inexpensive.  It is not unusual for them to be priced in the $10 region.

It isn't as if Dell doesn't support SATA, it is that they don't have internal mounting for SATA and don't want to waste time qualifying ancient hardware. They want you to upgrade the computer obviously.
0
Powerful Yet Easy-to-Use Network Monitoring

Identify excessive bandwidth utilization or unexpected application traffic with SolarWinds Bandwidth Analyzer Pack.

PowerEdgeTechIT ConsultantCommented:
Watch the card type though ... not all 2800's have PCIe riser cards (some are PCI-X).  You would also need to find a way to power an SSD "taped" to the inside of the server, since the power supply/motherboard have no molex/SATA connections.
0
no_usernameAuthor Commented:
Thanks for all the input.  Will this RAM work?

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006QYE08W/

And here is a photo inside the server - is this PCIe or PCI-X?

PE2800
0
PowerEdgeTechIT ConsultantCommented:
PCI-X

That RAM seems to meet the criteria.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
DavidPresidentCommented:
If no source of powr, and you don't want to get it from a CD/DVD, then go with the external eSATA.  That is designed to get power from the external enclosure.
0
no_usernameAuthor Commented:
I am having a hard time finding a PCI-X SATA card.  Is the slot to the far left regular PCI?  Would something like this work:

http://www.amazon.com/Syba-SATA-RAID-Controller-SY-PCI40010/
0
PowerEdgeTechIT ConsultantCommented:
That link appears to be broken.

Yes, that is a 5V PCI slot.
0
DavidPresidentCommented:
You can get PCI-X SAS cards rather inexpensively on ebay.  Here is one on a buy-it-now for $14.99  there are probably other deals to be found, but this was just the top one on my search list and he has 5 left.  (P.S. description is wrong, the 3080x is not hardware RAID and also supports SATA disks).


http://www.ebay.com/itm/LSI-Logic-PCI-X-SAS-Raid-Controller-SAS3080X-with-2-Device-Cable-HP-403053-001-/370664999266?pt=US_Server_Disk_Controllers_RAID_Cards&hash=item564d5b0962

Cabling is here ..
http://www.ebay.com/itm/SAS-29-Pin-to-2-X-7-Pin-SATA-Cables-with-15-Pin-SATA-Power-Cable-/290965684861?pt=US_Drive_Cables_dapters&hash=item43bee8027d

You are on your own to check into Win2K3 drivers but this solves issue with controller & cabling.  Or you could go with a SAS SSD if budget allows.

P.S. I wouldn't go with the card with HP firmware, try to find the LSI 380x, or 34xx family. Any of them will do. Suffix is the bus connector and type of cabling, either internal or external.
0
no_usernameAuthor Commented:
Sorry - this is the correct link:

http://www.amazon.com/Syba-SATA-RAID-Controller-SY-PCI40010/dp/B002R0DZZ8/

If there is a PCI slot - why wouldn't I go that route over the PCI-X?
0
DavidPresidentCommented:
It comes down to the specifics of the type of PCI slot.  Consider if you have a SATA-3 or SAS-2 SSD that can transfer a combined 380MB/sec  (really important .. look up the specs of the SSD to see the limits).

A standard 32-bit PCI card at 33Mhz tops out at 133MB/sec.  You could have the fastest SSD on the planet and most you'll get out of it would be 133MB/sec.

But a PCI-X slot would be 2-8X faster than that PCI slot depending on the specifics.  No matter what, the PCI-X will have at least twice the throughput.

So bottom line, put that SSD in a PCI slot and you'll get the same data transfer speed of a $49.00 mechanical disk drive.
0
no_usernameAuthor Commented:
Ok - got it.  I purchased a 450mb/s Kingston SSD Now 300V so limiting it to 133mb/s would not be ideal.  Instead of buying a SAS card and converting it to SATA what about a PCI-X SATA II card like this:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/AOC-SAT2-MV8-Supermicro-8-Port-SATA-II-Controller-Card-PCI-X-/111179263841?pt=US_Computer_Disk_Controllers_RAID_Cards&hash=item19e2ccef61

I know it would be limited to 300mb/s but thats better than 133.
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Server Hardware

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.