IP Address

I have a couple of users that will be getting new PC's.   Can I use the network IP address for thier old machine, on the new machine?

For example.   John has an old Windows XP box.  IP  10.1.1.60 and he is getting a new Windows 7 box.    Can I re-use that same IP address on his new machine?

Remembering something about machine SID????    Does that come into play?
bankwestCTO/CashierAsked:
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rindiCommented:
As long as no other PC on the LAN uses the same IP it is fine. But why assign a static IP to user's PC's? That only generates more work for managing and keeping track of all those IP's. Only servers, printers etc., to which the others connect to need static IP's, and even then you should be able to assign them via the DHCP Server.
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IKtechCommented:
If you do decide to use dhcp you can add reservations (using the MAC address) so the pc gets the same IP address from the dhcp server.
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bankwestCTO/CashierAuthor Commented:
This may be a dumb question.....If you are adding reservations so PC gets the same IP, why not just use static address?

I am learning all this as I go, so advise is very appreciated.

We do have specific ranges set aside for workstations.... another range for printers....another range for servers   etc.
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IKtechCommented:
this works well for me because i have a proxy server that only allows access to certain websites if the request comes from a specific ip address.  So i can leave the laptop/PC network adapter settings set to "obtain an ip address automatically" but also be certain the machine is always using the same ip address.

Imagine setting up a laptop user with a static ip.  As soon as the person tries to work from home or connect using a wire at a hotel, the static ip won't work and you will probably get a phone call requesting some help diagnosing the "problem".
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Qlemo"Batchelor", Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
DHCP is not only to provide IP addresses, but additional info like default gateway, DNS server, WINS, NetBIOS settings, DNS domain suffixes, ... so it can make sense to have reservations in DHCP.

And no, there is no relation between a SID and an IP address. If you replace the old thru the new machine, not having both running the same time, you can have them use the same IP.
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Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
I have a slightly different view.
In smaller organizations it's sometimes very worthwhile to use static IP addresses.
One example is when one might be motivated to use UNC addressing using the IP address.
Another is if doing network sniffing and wanting to grab the traffic of a particular workstation.
.. and so forth ..

The bottom line is that I use static addresses when it seems to make sense.

And, having ranges for different things is a nice way to maintain a level of sanity.  And, in fact, this may lend itself to assigning a DHCP pool.  An example of this is where we use DHCP for wireless clients only.  And, even with those we could reserve addresses; these addresses are generally outside the DHCP pool.
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Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
Since I often want to get information from the old machine, I always give a new machine a new IP address.  I use fixed IPs for machine with webservers and database servers and DHCP for others.  I moved to that when a power outage scrambled all my IP addresses.
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Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
DaveBaldwin brings up an interesting point:
Why not give the new machine a new address?
Perhaps the answer would be revealing.
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bankwestCTO/CashierAuthor Commented:
We don't allow remote access outside our network...So pro's and cons to statis vs dhcp?
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rindiCommented:
If you use the DHCP server to assign static IP's, you can't make mistakes like assigning the same IP to more than one device. You also don't have to go to every PC and change it's settings manually, and the DHCP server has it all on one central place. That makes it much easier to manage.
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bankwestCTO/CashierAuthor Commented:
THANK YOU ALL so much for the great input.   I believe I WILL assign new IP addresses and we are a small company where managing the static IP is not that difficult.   May move to DHCP in near future
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Qlemo"Batchelor", Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
Besides the "risk" of IP addresses changing for machines being off for a while, there are no con's against DHCP. New machines just work. (That could be considered another con, as BYOD [Bring Your Own Device] may not be what you want to allow, and it is easier to do with DHCP).
Using full static IPs is a lot of work more to do, as you have to go the the physical machine and enter all necessary data. Hence the mixture is usually done, as described above: Servers get a static IP, workstations dynamic. Whether the static IPs are full static IPs or DHCP reservations doesn't matter.
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