How to get referring source page in Google Analytics?

I'm familiar with

Behavior > Site content > Landing pages

and then add secondary dimension of Source to get the referring domain name.  But how do you also get the URL or at least page from the referrer?
brettrAsked:
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Scott Fell, EE MVEDeveloper & EE ModeratorCommented:
I have only looked at the domains.  I know the actual source pages used to be there. I wonder if this went away like keywords "due to https".
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COBOLdinosaurCommented:
I think it is part of the "We are Google Empire and the only ones allowed details... unless you are prepared to pay us."  Google, NSA, and Big ad buyers are the only ones that can be trusted.  

Though if you dig around you might run across a hard to get to/find back alley in Googleville where you can pry the information loose; just so Google can say "everything is still available for free".

Cd&
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brettrAuthor Commented:
Though if you dig around you might run across a hard to get to/find back alley in Googleville where you can pry the information loose; just so Google can say "everything is still available for free".

You just talking out of your head or does such a think exist?
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COBOLdinosaurCommented:
does such a think exist?

I have no idea; just speculation based on history.  The latest iteration of Google is still too new to know where everything is hidden.  I have other analytics that give me more detail than Google so I don't have dig down through the layers to find useful information.  If you are prepared to pay for analytics then there are alternatives; or if you really want control you write your own tracking routines and produce exactly what you want from the trips to your site (except we no longer get any information on searches from Google) and keywords have pretty much become irrelevant.

Cd&
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marketizeitCommented:
Try installing this custom report in GA:

Link Analysis
https://www.google.com/analytics/web/template?uid=zuSjXUnWQdapdeI9PuBqzA

What websites are sending you the best traffic? If you're link building, what links are worth going back for more? Link building isn't all about rankings, it's about increasing traffic and conversions as well. If you find a few gems, it's worth looking into them more.

Here are the columns you'll see with the report:

Source
Landing Page
Visits
Goal Completions
Pages/Visit
Bounce Rate
Percentage New Visits
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brettrAuthor Commented:
@COBOLdinosaur: Wouldn't more analytics slow down your site?
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Scott Fell, EE MVEDeveloper & EE ModeratorCommented:
>Wouldn't more analytics slow down your site?

First of all, are you on shared or cloud hosting?  If so, nothing to worry about.  You have 1000 others that are mostly doing things that are probably doing things they shouldn't.  

If you have  a dedicated server, just set the stats package to process logs when the site is slow.  I have used smarterstats for 13 years as it was installed on my shared hosting and I use it on my dedicated hosting http://www.smartertools.com/smarterstats/web-analytics-seo-software.aspx.  There is a free open source project http://piwik.org/

Google Analytics will tell you what pages are served (only where the GA code is placed on the page) and your server stats will tell you what was requested.  I have used other stats packages as well such as awstats (I found worthless) and webtrends http://webtrends.com/.

No two stas packages will report the same numbers.  They all have their own business logic and the key is to keep comparing one flaw against itself.   You will find that GA stats are much lower than server stats.    

Another thing insight you will gain from server stats is diagnosing error pages and detecting  the bad guys trying to break in.  Even though I will not install wordpress on my dedicated server, I am always seeing calls to /wp-admin/ because it is so common.
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COBOLdinosaurCommented:
>>>Wouldn't more analytics slow down your site?

Only if they are bloated crap.  Anything on the client side is going to be slower than the kind of stuff I can do on the server with a combination logging, session management, and very efficient use of the DB.

I do analytic processes as part of my security methods that I have to run anyway, and saved information in tables and files can be analyzed, manipulated, and used for reporting using low priority CRON jobs in background. For me GA is just supplemental information.

Cd&
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