deploy Hyper-v on virtual windows server 2008 R2

Hi, in a test lab I'm attempting to add the role of Hyper-v to a 2008 R2 server but i get the error message: Please see attachment Hyper error 1.
When I select the virtual machine and click on settings and then the CPU i get the following displayed: Hyper error 2 attachment. As you can see the options for virtual technology support are greyed out.
I have a Qaud core i7 chip and i have gone into the BIOS and checked 2 settings:
Intel Virtualization Tech and Intel HT Technology. I have set them both to enabled and booted the PC. I have also booted the virtual server ( i also tried deploying the role to a 2008 R2 AD server but got same result) but i am still getting the same error.
Any ideas much appreciated.
Hyper-Error-1.gif
Hyper-Error-2.jpg
LVL 1
Jason ThomasAsked:
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Jeff MorlenNetwork EngineerCommented:
Can you supply the model of the i7 chip that you have?
You can query Intel's site to see if visualization is supported.
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Jason ThomasAuthor Commented:
Hi thanks for responding, it is the 2.67 GH Intel Core i7 920
I was under the impression that all i7 chips supported the virtual technology?
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
You CANNOT enable the hyper-v role in a virtual machine. It can only be enabled on a natively installed OS on bare metal.
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Jeff MorlenNetwork EngineerCommented:
Okay... that processor, to me, looks like it should run Hyper-V 2008 R2 okay.

Is your server installed as 32bit?  I don't think you can with R2, but worth checking.
Have you tried turning off HT in BIOS?  It should not impact Hyper-V, but worth checking.

I've run into systems where I could not install Hyper-V Server 2008R2 but could install ESX 5.0... which is really weird, but understandable being its Windows vs. Linux.

Let me know.
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Jason ThomasAuthor Commented:
Of course, that makes sense dude and ties in with the fact that you can only deploy 4 hyper-v's per 2008 installation. One thing i don't understand, i'm watching a trainsignal video and the guy there does deploy the role and he is using a VM i am sure of it, any ideas on that?
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
I am not going to debate hypothetical based on what you are "sure of" in a video. Because of how hyper-v works and how the hypervisor is installed when you enable the role, it must be done on a physically installed OS. Take it or leave it.
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Jason ThomasAuthor Commented:
I've requested that this question be closed as follows:

Accepted answer: 0 points for JasonHels's comment #a39572138

for the following reason:

can't be any other answer
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Jeff MorlenNetwork EngineerCommented:
You have, after enabling the options in BIOS, powered the computer 100% off and back on... right?
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Jeff MorlenNetwork EngineerCommented:
AH... you were trying to add the hyper-v role to a virtual machine?!?
Yeah, you aren't supposed to be able to do that... but, if you google it, you will find a workaround.
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
I will point out that while there are supposed "workarounds" to enable Hyper-V on a Hyper-V VM, I *strongly* advise against using them. The Hyper-V hypervisor does some interesting things at the hardware level to enable the virtual switch and to virtualize the storage via the VMBus and those changes operate at the hardware level.

The workaround in this case basically causes the role installer to "ignore" the fact that it is in a VM and it tries to interact with the VM's virtualized hardware the same way that it would with physical hardware.

Of course because the hardware is virtualized, it doesn't actually act the same way. There are circumstances where the VM may make a request to the hypervisor, and the VM's VM is making a similar I/O request, and the data actually is lost in transit because the VM layer responds in a way that was unanticipated.

So if you are content running a VM in a VM that can blue-screen, lose data, corrupt files, and circumvent the hypervisor security model...by all means, implement the published workarounds. Otherwise, it is best left alone.
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
As a final aside, did you mean to only accept your own comment as the solution, as I see no solution in your comment?  I haven't raised an official objection yet, but that doesn't seem accurate...
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Jason ThomasAuthor Commented:
Yes I meant to chose your answer, how do I change it now?
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
I'll post this comment as an objection to the question being closed (I can think of no other way) and let a moderator work with you, since this is per your request, per comment #39572373.  I just didn't want to object until we figured out what you were intending.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
While you can install the role using DISM, it will not start if the machine you install it on is a VM in a hyper-v based virtual host.

You also mentioned something else that is at best misleading.

Hyper-V supports HUNDREDS of VMs with no problem - if you have sufficient hardware (RAM, processor, disk, etc).  "... ties in with the fact that you can only deploy 4 hyper-v's per 2008 installation." What I suspect you are talking about is the 4 VMs granted with Enterprise edition of Server 2008 R2.  That's a LICENSE for you to use UP TO 4 VMs without the need to purchase additional WINDOWS licenses.  Each installation of an operating system requires a license.  Windows installs require Windows licenses.  Linux installs require linux licenses (many of which are "free").  Hyper-V does not license the number of VMs.  But the VM has to be licensed as if it were installed on hardware.
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
You are trying to enable Hyper-V  in a Vmware Virtual Machine.   This scenario will no work since hyper-v does not have physical access to the virtualization hardware in the cpu that it requires.
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Jason ThomasAuthor Commented:
No idea what you're wanting me to do dude. More than happy for the points to go to cgaliher
so help yourself. I meant to close this and assign the points and made a mistake.
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Jason ThomasAuthor Commented:
Hi, when i accepted a solution i made the mistake of selecting my own post. Thats it. What is the big deal here?
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