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Required DNS Entries for EMail Server (Best Practices)

I just rolled out SBS 2011 with Exchange 2010 on it. Everything is working great.

I have discovered that a few emails do not go through to their destination. (Less than 1%).

I suspect that I have not properly configured my DNS with the minimum required entries for best practices.

The only thing I did was to create an MX record but I did not create an SPF or PTR or rDNS or anything else.

Can someone give me a list of the records I need to be running under best practices with the least chance of problems?

Thanks!
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GenesisTech
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GenesisTech
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2 Solutions
 
R--RCommented:
You can create a SPF record and RDNS (PTR) record. As some of the mail servers does not accept emails from the domain that does not have RDNS/PTR record.
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GenesisTechAuthor Commented:
R-R,

Thank you for your response but you only kind of addressed my question.

I am asking for a list of all DNS records that should be created as a best practices for setting up a mail server.

Thanks!
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Simon Butler (Sembee)ConsultantCommented:
For an Exchange server you only NEED three:

remote.example.com (common name)
Autodiscover.example.com

MX record (Which can be remote.example.com).

You will then need to speak to your ISP and get them to set a PTR on your static IP address to remote.example.com.
Ensure that remote.example.com is on the Send Connector. If you are using SBS to setup the server then that should be done for you.

Everything else is optional.
SPF records can help, and would be considered good practise.

However if you suspect the problem is with DNS records then you should get NDRs, those NDRs will tell you if something is wrong.
There are lots of reasons why email delivery can fail, for example if you are using logos in your signatures then that can trip content based filtering (rather than host based filtering) which can result in email being dropped silently as spam.

Simon.
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GenesisTechAuthor Commented:
Simon,

Awesome, complete answer. THANK YOU SO MUCH.

I did everything you listed correct right from the start and everything is functioning great.

We did have 1 domain that was rejecting our email with an NDR of 4.4.7. I did some research and everything I could find said this was probably happening because there was no SPF or PTR record. Hence the reason I asked about correct DNS records to make sure I had done everything correct.

Any quick thoughts on the NDR 4.4.7?

Thanks!
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Simon Butler (Sembee)ConsultantCommented:
The codes on their own are useless - need the full text.
You should have a PTR - if you don't then a lot of major email providers will reject the email. I would go as far as to say a PTR is mandatory.

SPF is optional. I do configure it as a matter of course, but you shouldn't have problems if you don't have one.

Simon.
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GenesisTechAuthor Commented:
OK - If it happens again I will create a new question and post the full NDR to see if I can get some help with it.

Thanks again!
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