Turning router into access point. Win7 and XP systems.

This is an extension of question ID28240278.    I want to make absolutely sure I have the correct procedure.

Modem and Netgear (router 1) are in the main house.  Linksys (router 2) is in a cottage.  An ethernet cord goes from the Netgear to the Linksys.

Here is the network topology:

Modem -> Netgear (Router 1)

Netgear (Router 1) has the following connected via ethernet ports:  
XP computer
Synology NAS
Linksys (Router 2)

Linksys (Router 2) has:  
Win7 computer
Ethernet connected Printer.

I am trying to access the Synology NAS via the Win7 computer.

I want to make sure which router I’m suppose to disable DHCP on.  

My understanding is that I disable DHCP on the Linksys (router 2).  Is this correct?  I also assign an IP address to the Linksys that’s within the address range of devices defined in the Netgear.  Then I take the ethernet cable from the WAN or Internet port on the Linksys and switch that to any of its four LAN ports.  I should then be able to access the Internet from the Win 7 computer, access the printer, and still get WIFI in the cottage.

Is this correct?

Thanks,
Al
Alan SilvermanOwnerAsked:
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wolfcamelCommented:
sounds correct - you are basically turning the Linksys into a hub/switch with wireless.
the internet/wan port on the Linksys should be an IP that is not on the IP range. the Ethernet port should be.
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Close but not quite.

To do as you want (and is what I do in my home office):

1. Connect a LAN port on the cottage Linksys to the main network (LAN port). Not the WAN port.

2. Log into the Linksys and give it a Static IP address on the main network. Probably something like 192.168.1.11 (not in the Netgear DHCP range).

3. Turn DHCP OFF on the Linksys.

Now it is just an extension of the main network.

... Thinkpads_User
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wolfcamelCommented:
if the two routers both have wifi - make sure they are different.
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
The two routers are hooked up by Ethernet cable according to the above. You might need to experiment with channels if the Netgear is also wireless.

... Thinkpads_User
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CompProbSolvCommented:
I would just add one suggestion to these good answers.  I typically put a piece of black tape over the WAN connector on the second (Linksys in this case) router.  Without that, whenever there is a perceived problem with the second router or if the box is moved and cables reconnected, some "clever" person will typically reconnect it "correctly" by using the WAN port.  With tape covering the port, it is pretty clear that it was not being used before.
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Alan SilvermanOwnerAuthor Commented:
I just logged into the customer’s routers.  They’re actually a Cisco (router1) and D-Link 601 (router2).

Here is the Lan configuration for the cisco:
cisco settings1
Here are the wireless settings for the cisco:

cisco settings2
Here are the Dlink router2 settings:

dlink settings1
dlink settings2
Could you give me examples of settings I should use? Where do I set router2's ip address to fixed?  I'm not sure what you mean by experimenting with the wifi and the channels.

Thanks,
Al
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
So based on the above, you want to follow the settings in my first post.

1. D-Link LAN should be 192.168.1.11 (not 100, not in the DHCP range).

2. D-Link DHCP should be turned OFF.

3. Hook up LAN to LAN.

The Cisco LAN looks fine.

For Wireless, you can use the same SSID, same wireless security (WPA2) and same passphrase. Use 2 different channels if the routers are in range of each other.

.... Thinkpads_User
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
For clarity, the DHCP range of the Cisco starts at 100 (your picture above). If you assign 192.168.1.11 to the D-Link, it is automatically Static (because it is outside the range of DHCP). You don't "set" static, just provide the IP address.

... Thinkpads_User
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Alan SilvermanOwnerAuthor Commented:
Got it!  Tell you how it goes.
Thanks so much,
Al
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Alan SilvermanOwnerAuthor Commented:
WORKED!  One thing to add.  Had to pull the electric from the two routers and the modem to reset them before I had connectivity through the lan.
Thanks to all,
Alan
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
@alanlsilverman - Thanks. I am glad you got it working and I was happy to help.

.... Thinkpads_User
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