Revise DNS settings for Exchange 2013

I know that DNS can be a "religious topic", and I have had cases where even poorly implemented DNS works adequately, but following an upgrade to Ex13, I want to take a fresh look at my DNS settings since some of them date back to the guy before me and probably back to an NT domain.  

First question, under primary domain->DomainDNSZones->_tcp there is a _ldap entry for a DC that has been gone for many years (and no longer in AD).  Can I just delete this?  Also in reverse lookup for the same domain I found NS entries that were from yesteryear and I deleted them. Was this ok to do?

Also, we accept mail for our primary domain and a few variants all of which are listed in DNS but only the primary is part of AD.  Each alternate domain has a mailserver.alt-domain.com MX record that points to the primary domain Exchange server.  I just read to NOT have MX records internally since the clients know how to get to the server already.  Should I delete these?

And finally, there is a CNAME record in all the alternate domains named '*' that points to the primary webserver (now gone anyway and hosted outside).  I think I should delete these guys.  Correct?

Oh and one more - I had an entry called 'legacy' that was used to point to the Ex07 server during my migration to Ex13.  I assume I can kill this, too?

Any Microsoft DNS guys up on Exchange 2013 that can advise me on this?  Thanks.
dvanakenAsked:
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Chris DentPowerShell DeveloperCommented:
> First question, under primary domain->DomainDNSZones->_tcp there is a _ldap entry for a > DC that has been gone for many years (and no longer in AD).  Can I just delete this?

Yes.

> Also in reverse lookup for the same domain I found NS entries that were from
> yesteryear and I deleted them. Was this ok to do?

Yes for that one too.

> I just read to NOT have MX records internally since the clients know how to
> get to the server already.  Should I delete these?

If you have no need for them, yes. MX are used by mail servers to deliver mail between themselves. Client-end systems have no use for MX records.

You only need them if you have other SMTP internally that use MX for delivery.

>  CNAME ... I think I should delete these guys.  Correct?

If it's no longer valid it can go.

> Oh and one more - I had an entry called 'legacy' that was used to point
> to the Ex07 server during my migration to Ex13.  I assume I can kill this, too?

It's not a reserved or dynamically registered name, if the server it points to is gone so can the record.

A happy round of everything you're doing is right :)

Cheers,

Chris
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dvanakenAuthor Commented:
Chris-

Many thanks.  What is the significance of the CNAME called '*'?  Is that a wildcard or default?
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Chris DentPowerShell DeveloperCommented:
Yep, that's right. It's a wildcard (and not default). If the thing the wildcard points to is gone it can't be doing anything. Consequently getting rid of it in that circumstance should be perfectly acceptable.

Chris
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dvanakenAuthor Commented:
That should do it! Thank you.
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dvanakenAuthor Commented:
Thanks again Chris - your expertise is much appreciated!
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