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~ file permission change

I've just done the following

chmod -R o-rwx ~

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Is that likely to have any nast knock on effects? e.g. perhaps some system process requires public read/list permissions?
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CEHJ
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CEHJ
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3 Solutions
 
Eoin OSullivanConsultantCommented:
Where did you apply these permissions? What directory?
If you use the tilde (~) then you are applying permissions to your Home User directory (the root folder for the currently logged in user ~/ is the same as /Users/myusername/ on OSX and Unix systems.

OSX has a program in the Applications/Utilities folder called Disk Utility

You can run the Verify Permissions and Repair Permissions options on your hard drive and it will correct any mis-set file and folder permissions.  If the permissions you set are not in conflict with OSX requirements then it will leave them as you have set them.

Unless you are very familiar with unix file and folder permissions I'd recommend you do not change permissions on files or folders on the /System /Library or other key folders on your OSX system.
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Daniel HelgenbergerCommented:
Hello, this should have no side effects at all. Removing world-rights from your home dir is even recommended. There are no processes witch need access to your home directory if not run by you (then they will have access).
Even if you did add 'sudo' it would do no 'bad' things.

Using disk utility's fix permissions would not change this back btw.
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CEHJAuthor Commented:
Hello, this should have no side effects at all. Removing world-rights from your home dir is even recommended.
I thought so - was just being cautious. I'm not at the box now, so am wondering what umask is set? The user in question would never work from the command line, so i wonder what is the 'umask for the gui'?
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Eoin OSullivanConsultantCommented:
Default umask for the standard user is 002 and for admin is 022
You can set the users default umask settings in their 'launchd-user.conf' so that all files and folders created by them will use the custom setting if 002 is not what you want.

Here's apple's article on setting umask values and you can follow the link near the top of that article for more detail on OSX permissions
http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2202
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Daniel HelgenbergerCommented:
MacOS's default umask is 0022 for GUI applications. It's controlled by launchd. Eg. something like
launchctl umask 002
would change it. Btw, you can add set this as default by editing
/etc/launchd.conf
/etc/launchd-user.conf
These files still seem to work to my knowledge.
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CEHJAuthor Commented:
Thanks
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