Client doesn't like the way the responsive site works

rockypointendoscopy.com- the client asked for a site that would work for all screen sizes including mobile. I used this dreamweaver template that is responsive. But he doesn't like the way elements stack, like the icons for service, about, testimonials and contact on the home page, and the photos in the footer, He'd rather they just reduce in size. Anything I can do there without rebuilding the site? Thanks.
mel200Asked:
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GaryCommented:
For the icons remove the media query that sets them to display block/100% width.
For the footer (Partners) place all the elements in a 75(ish)% width div and then separate the text (Partner Companies) from the images (clear:both) then the images should have a width of 32%
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mel200Author Commented:
Are you able to tell me about the media query is? I am having trouble finding it.
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mel200Author Commented:
Hi- I'm sorry, but I'm going to need more instruction. I tried to do the footer here: http://www.rockypointendoscopy.com/test.html  but I am not having any luck.
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Scott Fell, EE MVEDeveloper & EE ModeratorCommented:
There are times when the client is not right and it is your job to explain this the right way.  This is one of those times.  If you simply make the site smaller, it is hard to read and defeats the purpose.  The reason things stack is to keep the font size readable without having to zoom and scroll.

The idea here is you put a little extra time into formating each page as you have to think about what the page will look like for large, medium and small screens but the end result is more efficient than building a static desktop and mobile version of the site.

The client may not be used to this yet and thinks it is odd, this is where your expertise in answering questions and objections come in to  play.
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mel200Author Commented:
Thank you, padas, I think you are right.
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COBOLdinosaurCommented:
"The customer is always right" is only for retail. Professionals like lawyers, surgeons, and Web Developers have a responsibility to try and keep their customers from making serious mistakes.

Cd&
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GaryCommented:
The customer is always right (unless we know better!)
It is too hard to debug your minified css to know where it is, if you can upload a non minified version (and change your html references to use the non minified version) then it will be easy to tell you on what line the query is kicking in.
As a rule you should never use minified versions of js/css on a development site.
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mel200Author Commented:
I appreciate your thoughts. I've sent an email to the client, is it ok if I wait to see what he responds?
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Scott Fell, EE MVEDeveloper & EE ModeratorCommented:
If they decide to still go forward 'their' way, I would make a contract with options A and B for them to select.  Because if they want to make a site that will not be a good experience for mobile, they will eventually get complaints and it could fall back on you.  This way you will always have the contract to remind them you, "told them so" without having to actually say it that way.  

Good luck.
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mel200Author Commented:
Thanks, this is all great advice!
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mel200Author Commented:
Thanks- this was the correct answer. Not that he listened to me, but we came up with a sort of compromise.
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COBOLdinosaurCommented:
we came up with a sort of compromise.



That is the common way a lot of web development gets done.  It is almost always a balance between a client with a vision and a business model, and a developer who understands the technical limits leading the client down the path to "what will work well".  Almost never perfect, but as long as it is not crap the client gets what they are paying for.

Cd&
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