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Import CSV file to Excel 2010

Posted on 2013-10-22
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Last Modified: 2013-11-06
Import CSV file to Excel 2010

I am trying to import CSV file to Excel 2010, but I cannot get the separated columns. it puts all fields that are separated with comma in one column of Excel. I need them separated in columns.
in the wizard I selected comma, but still does not work.

Any help ?

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Question by:jskfan
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by:Missus Miss_Sellaneus
Missus Miss_Sellaneus earned 50 total points
ID: 39591933
Can you attach the first couple of lines of the CSV file here? Copy the file to a different name and delete the extra lines instead of copying and pasting text, just in case the problem is related to unseen characters.
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Spyder2010 earned 450 total points
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Open your .csv file like you have been, so that all data is in column1.  Highlight column1.  Click on the 'Data' tab on the Ribbon. Click on the 'Text to Columns' button.  Choose 'Delimited', click Next.  In the Delimiters area, highlight only 'Comma', click Next.  Format column data on the next screen if you want, if not, click Finish.  This will separate your data into columns delimited by commas.

If this does not work, you might want to try opening your .csv file in a word editor, and verify that you actually have comma separated data, and not some other delimiter.  Find and Replace can help fix this if this is the issue.
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by:jskfan
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